The “Irreducible Minimum” of the Saving Gospel of Jesus Christ (Revision of Pages 72-77 of The Salvation Meter Book)

INTRODUCTION

Pages 72-77 of my book The Salvation Meter – Biblical Self-Diagnostic Tests to Examine Your Salvation and Spiritual Growth articulate what I believe to be the “irreducible minimum” of the saving gospel of Jesus Christ.  By the expression “irreducible minimum,” I refer to the minimum elements necessary for the gospel to have salvific efficacy, i.e., to be the saving gospel of Jesus Christ.  The saving gospel of Jesus Christ is God’s power for salvation according to Romans 1:16 (NET):

16 For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is God’s power for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek.

Therefore, it is critical to strive to identify the “irreducible minimum.”

First, I do not want to advocate more than the “irreducible minimum” for the gospel to be salvific.  For example, to add works (e.g., circumcision) to the gospel results in a “different gospel” that is not saving per what Paul wrote in Galatians 1:6–7 (NET), which reads:

6 I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting the one who called you by the grace of Christ and are following a different gospel—7 not that there really is another gospel, but there are some who are disturbing you and wanting to distort the gospel of Christ.

Along this line, the reader may want to consider my blog article entitled “Does an Absolute Requirement of Water Baptism Negate the Salvific Efficacy of an Otherwise Saving Gospel?” (link: Does an Absolute Requirement of Water Baptism Negate the Salvific Efficacy of an Otherwise Saving Gospel? | Steve Belsheim ).  The conclusion reads:

In conclusion, my opinion is that the requirement of water baptism destroys the salvific efficacy of the message-in-question.

What about a convert who trusts in the message-in-question, can he or she be saved?  My opinion is that a convert who placed his or her trust or faith in a “different gospel”, i.e., a message that lacks salvific efficacy, cannot have been saved.  While on the surface it seems harsh, my opinion makes sense.  If a message lacks salvific efficacy, how can it save?  It cannot save.  No matter how sincere or committed the convert, a non-saving message cannot save.  This means that the convert who placed their trust or faith in the message-in-question cannot be saved. 

If my analysis is correct, and based on my current understanding of Scripture I believe it is, what does it mean for me?  How am I to interact with those who attend a church that mandates water baptism as an absolute requirement for salvation?  If I care about them, and I do, how to do I approach the issue?  These are important questions to ponder.

            Second, I do not want to proclaim a gospel with less than the “irreducible minimum” necessary to possess salvific efficacy.  For example, some may water down the gospel to such an extent that it falls within the ambit of Jude’s warning in Jude 3–4 (NET):

3 Dear friends, although I have been eager to write to you about our common salvation, I now feel compelled instead to write to encourage you to contend earnestly for the faith that was once for all entrusted to the saints.4 For certain men have secretly slipped in among you—men who long ago were marked out for the condemnation I am about to describe—ungodly men who have turned the grace of our God into a license for evil and who deny our only Master and Lord, Jesus Christ.

One commentary refers to the problem as “cheap grace” [emphasis added]:

The third charge confirms the second charge in that it states that the interlopers change God’s grace into a “license for immorality” (NIV) or, better, “into licentiousness” (NRSV). … The basic Christian confession was not a statement about Jesus forgiving sin, but about Jesus as Lord (Rom 10:9–10). In fact, Paul himself several times underlined the fact that those who show no repentance but continue in sin are not citizens of the kingdom (e.g., 1 Cor 6:9–11; Gal 5:19–21). Jude encounters the teaching of “cheap grace,” that is, grace without repentance or even grace that grants license to sin more than before, in the interlopers, and it becomes one of the charges against them.

Davids, P. H. (2006). The letters of 2 Peter and Jude (pp. 44–45). William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co.

            Another issue for the early church was the denial of the resurrection of the dead.  1 Corinthians 15:12–14 (NET) reads:

12 Now if Christ is being preached as raised from the dead, how can some of you say there is no resurrection of the dead? 13 But if there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. 14 And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is futile and your faith is empty.

One commentary reads:

While this Corinthian heresy probably arose around the general resurrection of believers on the last day, Paul referred more generally to the idea of resurrection. The phrase “resurrection of the dead” (anastasis nekron) appears in the Book of Acts without reference to a general resurrection (Acts. 26:23). Paul duplicated this use in Romans 1:4. Moreover, in 1 Corinthians 15:21 he used it as counterpart to physical “death.” He did not use this terminology solely as a technical term for the general resurrection.

The New Testament makes it clear that, like the Sadducees, Greek philosophers resisted the gospel because they rejected the idea of bodily resurrection. The argument that there is no resurrection of the dead may have been advanced by those Corinthians who had become enamored with such worldly wisdom. Perhaps these were the same opponents Paul addressed throughout the letter. Some commentators argue that these Corinthians spiritualized the resurrection of believers.

**

As far as Paul was concerned, any argument that opposed bodily resurrection denied Christ’s bodily resurrection. Because believers’ eternal resurrections and Jesus’ are of the same type, one cannot be possible and the other impossible. If people cannot be resurrected bodily, then Jesus was not resurrected. The fact of Christ’s resurrection invalidated any philosophical objection to the possibility of resurrection.

Pratt, R. L., Jr. (2000). I & II Corinthians (Vol. 7, p. 261). Broadman & Holman Publishers.  Boldface in original.

Furthermore, it is critical to identify the “irreducible minimum” because believers in general are reluctant to identify what they believe is the “irreducible minimum” of the saving gospel of Jesus Christ.  Years ago, I taught a class at church that focused on defining the “irreducible minimum” of the saving gospel of Jesus Christ.  The final assignment was to choose a favorite gospel-centered passage and unpack it identifying the “irreducible minimum.” Unfortunately, only about 10% of the class completed the final assignment.  I then realized that most folks are not comfortable with defining the “irreducible minimum.”

Such a discomfort with defining the “irreducible minimum” seems to exist with some published works.  Hopefully, the content of The Salvation Meter shows that I have read a lot of publications about the saving gospel of Jesus Christ.  Many of these publications have been authored by well-known Christian writers.  One trait that a surprising number of these publications have in common is a lack of an identification of the “irreducible minimum” of the saving gospel of Jesus Christ.  A person can read an entire book about salvation and never find an understandable, straightforward concise presentation of what is necessary for salvation. 

I believe what I wrote in the published The Salvation Meter book is a credible job.  However, as I wrote, “I am always open to review my work.”  Please do not hesitate to contact me with any concerns, criticisms, comments, etc. 

            Before I discuss the “irreducible minimum,” let me make one cautionary statement.  In trying to accomplish my goal to articulate the “irreducible minimum,” I do not want to dissuade anyone about the efficacy of their conversion event because every element was not set out in bullet points.   Some of the elements of the “irreducible minimum” are inherent in many gospel presentations. 

Typically, at their conversion, no one has extensive knowledge of soteriology.   Please do not become overly concerned if you cannot recollect if all of the “irreducible minimum” elements were present at your conversion.  It is not unusual that a believer is unsure about the specific time and date of their salvation.  But, what every believer ought to be sure of is that conversion did happen!  As you will appreciate from the tests of salvation in The Salvation Meter, the significant tests pertain to post-conversion evidence of salvation, and not evidence contemporaneous with the conversion event.  

THE “IRREDUCIBLE MINIMUM” OF THE SAVING GOSPEL OF JESUS CHRIST

The Two Basic Elements: Repentance and Faith

            It has been said that repentance and faith are two sides of the same coin meaning that both must exist for salvation.  The preceptaustin,org website (link: https://www.preceptaustin.org/acts-20-commentary ) quotes Brian Bell:

Brian Bell – Repentance and Faith must go together to complete each other like a door & its post.3.7.1. Repentance is the door which shuts out our sin. Faith is the post on which its hinges are fixed. A door w/o a doorpost to hang on…is not a door at all. A doorpost w/o the door hanging on it…is of no value whatever. “What God has joined together, let no man separate!” Repentance = turning from sin; Faith = trusting Christ for salvation. Let go of sin, lay hold of Christ! Patrick Morley writes that the church’s integrity problem is in the misconception “that we can add Christ to our lives, but not subtract sin. It is a change in belief without a change in behavior.”

Jesus identified repentance and faith as the basic components of the gospel per Mark 1:14–15 (NET), which reads [emphasis added]:

14 Now after John was imprisoned, Jesus went into Galilee and proclaimed the gospel of God.15 He said, “The time is fulfilled and the kingdom of God is near. Repent and believe the gospel!”

Acts 20:20–21 (NET) records where the Apostle Paul identified the same two components [emphasis added]:

20 You know that I did not hold back from proclaiming to you anything that would be helpful, and from teaching you publicly and from house to house, 21 testifying to both Jews and Greeks about repentance toward God and faith in our Lord Jesus.

Let’s learn more about each of these components.          

More Details about Repentance

Jesus issued the expression “Repent and believer the gospel!”  The NET translates the Greek verb metanoeō [lexical form] as “repent.”  The Logos 9 sense of this verb is to reconsider (repent) – to have a change of self (heart and mind) that abandons former dispositions and results in a new self, new behavior, and regret over former behavior and dispositions.  Louw et al. defines it to mean:

to change one’s way of life as the result of a complete change of thought and attitude with regard to sin and righteousness—‘to repent, to change one’s way, repentance.’

Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). In Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 509). United Bible Societies.

Acts 20:21 [NET] records that Paul identified “repentance toward God” as a component of the gospel.  The NET translates the Greek noun metanoia as “repentance.”   The Logos 9 sense is reconsideration – a change of self (heart and mind) that abandons former dispositions and results in a new self, new behavior, and regret over former behavior and dispositions.  Louw et al. defines to the noun the same as the verb.   Another Greek-English lexicon reads:

repentance, turning about, conversion; as a turning away μετάνοια ἀπὸ νεκρῶν ἔργων turning away from dead works Hb 6:1. Mostly of the positive side of repentance, as the beginning of a new relationship with God: ἡ εἰς θεὸυ μ. repentance that leads to God Ac 20:21.

Arndt, W., Danker, F. W., Bauer, W., & Gingrich, F. W. (2000). In A Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament and other early Christian literature (3rd ed., p. 640). University of Chicago Press.

The NET translates the Greek preposition eis as “toward.”  Eis functions as a preposition of reference which is used to express the reference or regard in which the author views another sentential element.  See Lukaszewski, A. L. (2007). The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament Glossary. Lexham Press.  Here, Paul linked repentance with God using eis so that the repentance comprises abandoning ungodly things in favor of God and godly things.  One commentator writes [emphasis added]:

REPENTANCE, as distinguished from faith, is that state of the “honest and good heart” which arises from a discovery of one’s contrariety to the righteous demands of the divine law. This is said to be “toward God,” because seeing Him to be the party dishonored by sin, it feels all its acknowledgments and compunctions to be properly due to Him, as the great Lawgiver, and directs them to Him accordingly; condemning, humbling itself, and grieving before Him, looking also to Him as its only Hope of deliverance.

Jamieson, R., Fausset, A. R., & Brown, D. (1997). Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible (Vol. 2, p. 209). Logos Research Systems, Inc.

            Repentance stems from a person’s recognition that they are a hell-bound sinner where sin is an offense to God.  They cannot save themselves, but must turn to God for salvation. 

Romans 3:23 (NET) teaches the human condition that, “all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.”   According to 1 John 3:4 (NET), to be a sinner means that a person has broken God’s law:

4 Everyone who practices sin also practices lawlessness; indeed, sin is lawlessness.

The proper mindset is like David’s when he realized his sin with Bathsheba was against God per 2 Samuel 12:13 (NET)

13 Then David exclaimed to Nathan, “I have sinned against the Lord!” Nathan replied to David, “Yes, and the Lord has forgiven your sin. You are not going to die.

Romans 6:23 (NET) teaches that an unbeliever is hell-bound:

23 For the payoff of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Ephesians 2:8–9 (NET) teaches the truth that no one can earn themselves a spot in heaven:

8 For by grace you are saved through faith, and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God; 9 it is not from works, so that no one can boast.

            Although the next section will discuss faith in Jesus Christ, out of the many religious systems globally, Christianity is the only effective way to receive salvation which leads to an eternity in heaven.  Jesus made this clear in John 14:6 (NET):

6 Jesus replied, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.

Peter made the same point as recorded in Acts 4:12 (NET):

12 And there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among people by which we must be saved.”

            In summary, one Bible dictionary discusses repentance [emphasis added]:

REPENTANCE Literally a change of mind, not about individual plans, intentions, or beliefs, but rather a change in one’s attitude about God. Such repentance accompanies saving faith in Christ (Acts 20:21). It is inconsistent and unintelligible to suppose that anyone could believe in Christ yet not repent. Repentance is such an important aspect of conversion that it is often stressed rather than saving faith, as when Christ said that there is joy in heaven among the angels over one sinner who repents (Lk 15:7). The apostles described the conversion of the Gentiles to Christ as God granting them “repentance unto life” (Acts 11:18). Evangelical repentance and faith in Christ are in fact inseparable, though a convert may be aware of one aspect more than another.

Elwell, W. A., & Comfort, P. W. (2001). In Tyndale Bible dictionary (pp. 1119–1120). Tyndale House Publishers.

More Details about Faith

The Concept of Faith being Complete Trust

            As recorded in Acts 20:21 [NET], Paul identified “faith in our Lord Jesus” as the second basic component of the saving gospel of Jesus Christ.  The NET translates the Greek noun pistis in Acts 20:21b as “faith”.  The Logos 9 sense of pistis is to trust in the gospel – trust in Jesus as contained in the content of the Gospel.  Louw et al. defines pistis as to believe to the extent of complete trust and reliance—‘to believe in, to have confidence in, to have faith in, to trust, faith, trust.’  See Louw et al. supra at Vol. 1, p. 375.  One translation handbook reads:

That they should turn from their sins to God. and believe in our Lord Jesus is a summary of Paul’s message. The first part, turn from their sins to God, is literally “repentance with respect to God.” But in biblical thought “repentance” always means “to turn from one’s sin,” and it always presupposes that in so doing one would turn to God. Therefore, within the phrase “repentance with respect to God” there are two clearly implied elements: (1) to turn from one’s sins, and (2) to turn to God. In the Christian sense one “turns from his sins to God” by believing in the Lord Jesus, though the Greek here has these two elements connected as though they were separate and distinct. Believe in our Lord Jesus is literally “belief with respect to our Lord Jesus,” but “belief” is one of those nouns which is basically verbal, that is, “to believe.”

Newman, B. M., & Nida, E. A. (1972). A handbook on the Acts of the Apostles (p. 390). United Bible Societies.

As one practical example, in the summer of 1859 a man named Charles Blondin pushed a wheel barrow across Niagara Falls while blindfolded.  Afterwards, he asked the audience if they believed he could carry a person across in the wheelbarrow.  The crowd responded that they believed he could do so.  Yet, when he asked for a volunteer, no one came forward.  It was apparent that while the people said they believed, no one trusted that Blondin could carry them across. 

To acknowledge something and to trust in something are two vastly different actions.  In this context, faith is to trust completely in who Jesus Christ is and what He did for one’s salvation.  The foundation of Christianity is historical facts.  Therefore, a person must “jump in the wheelbarrow” about some nonnegotiable historical facts about who Jesus Christ is and what He did. 

Jesus Christ is the Subject of Biblical Saving Faith

            As I see it, there are four critical attributes of the saving Jesus Christ in whom a person must trust.  These four attributes are: (1) He is the Son of God who is 100% God and 100% human; (2) He lived a sinless life on earth and so He is perfect; (3) out of His love for them, Jesus took their sins upon Himself, so when He willingly died on the cross as their substitute, He was the perfect sacrifice as full payment to God the Father for the forgiveness of all their sins; and (4) Jesus bodily rose from the grave, i.e., physical, bodily resurrection from death to life, showing that His death on the cross was satisfactory payment for their sins to have eternal life in Heaven.

To ignore or deny one or more of these attributes puts a person’s conversion event on shaky ground.  A person cannot place their complete trust in a non-saving Jesus and experience genuine conversion.

Let’s look at these essential attributes.

First, the Lord Jesus Christ in whom a person must trust in the truth that Jesus Christ is the Son of God who is 100% God and 100% human.  Theologians term the attribute that Jesus is 100% God and 100% human as the “hypostatic union.”  A formal definition reads:

hypostatic union: The union of Christ’s human and divine natures in one person (from the Greek ὑπόστασις, G5712, “being”). (26C.2)

Grudem, W. A. (2004). Systematic theology: an introduction to biblical doctrine (p. 1244). Inter-Varsity Press; Zondervan Pub. House.

In 1 John 1:1–3 (NET), the Apostle John taught about the deity of Christ and the humanity of Christ:

1 This is what we proclaim to you: what was from the beginning, what we have heard, what we have seen with our eyes, what we have looked at and our hands have touched (concerning the word of life—2 and the life was revealed, and we have seen and testify and announce to you the eternal life that was with the Father and was revealed to us).3 What we have seen and heard we announce to you too, so that you may have fellowship with us (and indeed our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ).

Along the lines of the earlier discussion about the preexistence of Christ (see pages 43-46 of The Salvation Meter book), by using the phrase “what was from the beginning” John established the preexistence of Jesus Christ, which meant that He always has been, is, and always will be God.  So we see that one attribute of the “what” is eternal preexistence with God the Father, i.e., “the eternal life was with the Father.”  Since we learn that the “what” is Jesus Christ, we know that preexistence, i.e., before the beginning of time, space and matter, is an attribute of Jesus Christ.  Jesus’ preexistence makes Him 100% God.

Throughout 1 John 1:1-3 we learn that the “what” was heard, seen, looked upon and touched.  This language describes the incarnate Jesus Christ, i.e., He is 100% human.  Further, in 1 John 4:2-3, the Apostle John made it clear that to deny the true humanity of Jesus Christ was to deny a fundamental precept of Christianity.  Such a denial was so severe that it could only come from the antichrist.  1 John 4:2–3 (NET) reads:

2 By this you know the Spirit of God: Every spirit that confesses Jesus as the Christ who has come in the flesh is from God, 3 but every spirit that does not confess Jesus is not from God, and this is the spirit of the antichrist, which you have heard is coming, and now is already in the world.

The phrase “has come in the flesh” refers to Jesus’ incarnation, which proves the fact that Jesus Christ is truly human, i.e., 100% human.  Any spirit that confesses Jesus’ incarnation “is from God.”  To be clear, John instructed his audience that the spirit that does not confess Jesus’ incarnation is “the spirit of the antichrist, which you have heard is coming and now is already in the world.”  The humanity of Jesus Christ is a critical attribute of the “saving” Jesus Christ.

The hypostatic union is a difficult, if not impossible, concept to understand.  Even so, a person needs to put their complete trust in the Lord Jesus Christ who is 100% God and 100% human. 

Second, a person must trust in the Lord Jesus Christ who lived a sinless life on earth and so He is perfect.  By what he wrote in 1 John 3:5 (NET), the Apostle John taught the sinless nature of Jesus Christ:

5 And you know that Jesus was revealed to take away sins, and in him there is no sin.

By the statement that in Jesus there “is no sin,” John assertively communicated to his audience that Jesus was without sin, is without sin, and always will be without sin. Therefore, because Jesus is sinless He is God, i.e., God the Son who is the Second Person of the Trinity. 

The attribute of Jesus’ sinlessness, i.e., perfection, is taught throughout the Bible.  Paul taught that Jesus is sinless when he used the phrase “who did not know sin” in 2 Corinthians 5:21 (NET), which reads:

21 God made the one who did not know sin to be sin for us, so that in him we would become the righteousness of God.

The author of Hebrews taught that Jesus is sinless when he wrote in Hebrews 4:15–16 (NET), which reads:

15 For we do not have a high priest incapable of sympathizing with our weaknesses, but one who has been tempted in every way just as we are, yet without sin. 16 Therefore let us confidently approach the throne of grace to receive mercy and find grace whenever we need help.

Jesus Christ had to be perfect for His death on the cross to be a sacrifice that appeased the wrath of God the Father against sin.  It is vital that a person place their complete trust in the Lord Jesus Christ who is sinless, therefore, perfect.

Third, one must trust in the truth that out of His love for them, Jesus took their sins upon Himself, so when He willingly died on the cross as their substitute, He was the perfect sacrifice (1 John 2:1-2) as full payment to God the Father for the forgiveness all of one’s sins.  2 Corinthians 5:21 (NET) teaches Christ’s substitutionary death:

21 God made the one who did not know sin to be sin for us, so that in him we would become the righteousness of God.

The New Living Translation adds some interpretative gloss to 2 Corinthians 5:21 (NLT) when it reads:

21 For God made Christ, who never sinned, to be the offering for our sin, so that we could be made right with God through Christ.

One commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:21 reads:

Third, Paul explained that sinful people, who are the enemies of God, can be reconciled to God only through Christ and his work on behalf of the human race. Paul summarized Christ’s work in two elements. On the one hand, God made Christ, who had no sin, to be sin. Paul did not mean that Christ actually became a sinner. Throughout his humiliation, Christ remained faithful and righteous. It is likely that Paul followed the Septuagint’s practice of using the term sin (harmartia) as a circumlocution for “sin offering” (e.g., Num. 6:14). The New Testament frequently refers to Isaiah 53 in which the Messiah’s death is declared to be “an offering for sin” (Isa. 53:10, NRSV). This language stems from the Old Testament sacrificial system and identifies the sacrifice that brought forgiveness to those for whom it was made (Lev. 4:5–10).

In this sense, Christ became the sin offering for us—for all who believe in him. In the gospel of the New Testament, salvation comes to enemies of God because Christ himself became the perfect and final substitutionary sacrifice on behalf of those who have saving faith in him.

Pratt, R. L., Jr. (2000). I & II Corinthians (Vol. 7, p. 360). Broadman & Holman Publishers.  Emphasis added.

            In another English translation, 1 John 2:1–2 (NET) teaches that Jesus was the perfect sacrifice (the atoning sacrifice or the propitiation) that comprised full payment to God the Father  for the forgiveness of all sins:

1 (My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin.) But if anyone does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous One,2 and he himself is the atoning sacrifice [hilasmos] for our sins, and not only for our sins but also for the whole world.

1 John 2:1–2 (NASB95) reads:

1 My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin. And if anyone sins, we have an Advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous; 2 and He Himself is the propitiation [hilasmos] for our sins; and not for ours only, but also for those of the whole world.

            The catalyst for a person surrendering their life in obedience to Christ (i.e., Jesus is the Lord of their life per Romans 10:9a) is their appreciation that out of His love, God provides the only way of salvation through Jesus Christ who is the Jewish Messiah.  The classic verse John 3:16 (NET) reads:

16 For this is the way God loved the world: He gave his one and only Son, so that everyone who believes in him will not perish but have eternal life.

John reinforced that fact when he wrote 1 John 4:10 (NET):

10 In this is love: not that we have loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the atoning sacrifice [hilasmos] for our sins.

            For both usages of hilasmos, the Logos 9 sense is propitiation – the means of appeasing wrath and gaining the good will of an offended person; especially with respect to sacrifices for appeasing angered deities.  Note what Louw et al. says about the translation “propitiation:

Though some traditional translations render ἱλαστήριον as ‘propitiation,’ this involves a wrong interpretation of the term in question. Propitiation is essentially a process by which one does a favor to a person in order to make him or her favorably disposed, but in the NT God is never the object of propitiation since he is already on the side of people. ἱλασμός and ἱλαστήριονa denote the means of forgiveness and not propitiation.

Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). In Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 503). United Bible Societies.

Propitiation is how sins are forgiven in the sense of appeasing the wrath and gaining the goodwill of an offended person.  By his use of hilasmos, John taught that a person’s sin was something through which they would incur God’s wrath in the absence of the death of Jesus Christ who was the suitable sacrifice.  Today, Jesus Christ is a believer’s “atoning sacrifice.”

Fourth a person must trust in the Lord Jesus Christ who bodily rose from the grave, i.e., physical bodily resurrection from death to life, showing that His death on the cross was satisfactory payment for their sins to have eternal life in Heaven.  In other words, Jesus’ death on the Cross was an atoning sacrifice or propitiation.  See 1 John 2:2.

A part of the role and work of Jesus Christ was that He had to die a physical death on the cross.  The Apostle John wrote 1 John 1:7 (NET), which reads:

7 But if we walk in the light as he himself is in the light, we have fellowship with one another and the blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin.

The expression “the blood of Jesus his Son” refers to Jesus’ sacrificial physical death on the cross.  By using the Greek verb kathorizο, which the NET translates as “cleanses,” in the present tense, John intended to convey to his audience that they were continually being cleansed from all their sins by the blood of God’s only Son, the Lord Jesus Christ.  The same is true for a believer today.  Notice Wuest’s translation:

Translation. But if within the sphere of the light we are habitually ordering our behavior as He Himself is in the light, fellowship we are having with one another. And the blood of Jesus His Son keeps continually cleansing us from every sin.

Wuest, K. S. (1997). Wuest’s word studies from the Greek New Testament: for the English reader (Vol. 13, p. 103). Eerdmans.

It is imperative to understand that the death of a sacrifice is necessary for forgiveness.  The sacrificial lamb of the Passover is a type or picture from the Old Testament of the sacrificial death of Jesus Christ, who is the Lamb of God.  John 1:29 (NET) makes the point:

29 On the next day John saw Jesus coming toward him and said, “Look, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!

Paul made this connection when he wrote 1 Corinthians 5:7 (NET):

7 Clean out the old yeast so that you may be a new batch of dough—you are, in fact, without yeast. For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed.

A bedrock principle of the Christian faith is the physical bodily resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.   The historical fact of the physical bodily resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead is a necessary component of the saving gospel of Jesus Christ.  In 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 (NET), Paul included Jesus’ physical bodily resurrection as a key component of the gospel (emphasis added):

1 Now I want to make clear for you, brothers and sisters, the gospel that I preached to you, that you received and on which you stand, 2 and by which you are being saved, if you hold firmly to the message I preached to you—unless you believed in vain. 3 For I passed on to you as of first importance what I also received—that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures, 4 and that he was buried, and that he was raised on the third day according to the scriptures,

With a focus on the importance of the physical resurrection of Jesus Christ, Paul made the point in 1 Corinthians 15:12-19 (NET) that Christians are to be pitied if the resurrection of Jesus Christ was not true because their hope in salvation would have no valid basis.  This passage reads:

12 Now if Christ is being preached as raised from the dead, how can some of you say there is no resurrection of the dead? 13 But if there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. 14 And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is futile and your faith is empty. 15 Also, we are found to be false witnesses about God, because we have testified against God that he raised Christ from the dead, when in reality he did not raise him, if indeed the dead are not raised. 16 For if the dead are not raised, then not even Christ has been raised. 17 And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is useless; you are still in your sins. 18 Furthermore, those who have fallen asleep in Christ have also perished. 19 For if only in this life we have hope in Christ, we should be pitied more than anyone.

The fact of Jesus’ Second Coming establishes Jesus’ physical bodily resurrection from the dead.   By writing 1 John 3:2 (NET), John taught his audience that Jesus would come back again, i.e., Jesus’ Second Coming:

2 Dear friends, we are God’s children now, and what we will be has not yet been revealed. We know that whenever it is revealed we will be like him, because we will see him just as he is.

The expression “when he appears” refers to Jesus’ Second Coming.  For Jesus to come a second time, He had to have been resurrected in a physical body from the grave.

Conclusion

            The faith component must comprise a person placing their complete trust and reliance in the Lord Jesus Christ who possesses the following attributes: (1) He is the Son of God who is 100% God and 100% human; (2) He lived a sinless life on earth and so He is perfect; (3) out of His love for them, Jesus took their sins upon Himself, so when He willingly died on the cross as their substitute, He was the perfect sacrifice as full payment to God the Father for the forgiveness of all their sins; and (4) Jesus physically, bodily rose from the grave, i.e., resurrection from death to life, showing that His death on the cross was satisfactory payment for their sins to have eternal life in Heaven.

CONCLUSION

            The basic components of the “irreducible minimum” of the saving gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ comprises repentance towards God and complete trust and reliance in the saving Lord Jesus Christ of the Bible.  Practically speaking, repentance towards God and complete trust and reliance in the saving Lord Jesus Christ of the Bible comprise two sides of the same coin.

            In order to repent, a sinner must realize their sinful condition and their resultant separation from God.  A repentant sinner turns away from their sin and toward God resulting in a complete change of thought and attitude with respect to sin and righteousness. 

            At the same time, the repentant sinner repents, they put their complete trust and reliance in the finished work of the saving Lord Jesus Christ.  The necessary attributes of the saving Lord Jesus Christ are: (1) He is the Son of God who is 100% God and 100% human; (2) He lived a sinless life on earth and so He is perfect; (3) out of His love for them, Jesus took their sins upon Himself, so when He willingly died on the cross as their substitute, He was the perfect sacrifice as full payment to God the Father for the forgiveness of all their sins; and (4) Jesus physically, bodily rose from the grave, i.e., resurrection from death to life, showing that His death on the cross was satisfactory payment for their sins to have eternal life in Heaven.

QUESTIONS

The intent of the below questions is to allow you to reflect on the substantive beliefs and actions connected with your conversion.  Would you please take the time to consider these questions carefully?  Would you please not omit details even if your answers are repetitive to your answers to earlier questions?

Question 3-1: Can you remember your conversion event?  If so, please describe your conversion in as much detail as you recall.  Did your conversion have  a specific “trigger” that caused you to realize your need for Jesus Christ as your Lord and Savior?  Please explain your answer.

Question 3-2:  If you lack recall of details about your conversion, is there any reason why?  Does your lack of recall cause you to question if you are a believer?  Please explain your answer.

Question 3-3:  Is it possible that you recall more than one event that could have been your conversion event?  If so, describe the details of these events.

Question 3-4:  Prior to your conversion event, what was your spiritual condition?  Please explain your answer and include a description of whether you were religious, irreligious, had some belief or interest in spiritual matters, some religious or spiritual background and the like.

Question 3-5:  Before your conversion event, do you recall the proclamation of the saving gospel of Jesus Christ?  Please explain your answer and include an account of what you recall about the proclamation.  For example, you could have heard the gospel multiple times and in different ways (e.g., one-on-one, small group, in a church service, large evangelistic crusade). 

Question 3-6:  Did the person proclaiming the gospel appear to do so with authority and credibility?   As best you can recall, had the gospel made a significant impact in the life of the one proclaiming the gospel?  Did that impact have any effect on the credibility of the proclamation?  Please explain your answers.

Question 3-7: Referring to your conversion event or prior thereto, can you recall a point in time when you felt God had opened your heart to respond to the gospel message?  If so, describe God opening your heart.

Question 3-8: Referring to your conversion event or prior thereto, can you recall various points in time when you felt God working in or on you to respond to the gospel message?  If so, describe how God worked on you.

Question 3-9: Referring to your conversion event, do you recall a point in time when you recognized that you were a sinner who could not save yourself?   Please explain your answer.

Question 3-10: Referring to your conversion event, can you recall a point in time when you felt you had repented of your sins?  If so, describe your repentance of your sins. 

Question 3-11: Referring to your conversion event, do you recall a point in time when you accepted and trusted in the truth that out of His love, God provided you with the only way of salvation, and that was through Jesus Christ?   Please explain your answer.

Question 3-12: Referring to your conversion event, do you recall a point in time when you accepted and trusted in the truth that Jesus Christ is fully (100%) God and fully (100%) human?  Please explain your answer.

Question 3-13: Referring to your conversion event, do you recall a point in time when you accepted and trusted in the truth that Jesus Christ lived a sinless life on earth and so He is perfect?  Please explain your answer.

Question 3-14: Referring to your conversion event, do you recall a point in time when you accepted and trusted in the truth that out of His love for you, Jesus took your sins upon Himself, so when He willingly died on the cross as your substitute, He was the perfect sacrifice as full payment to God the Father for the forgiveness all of your sins?  Please explain your answer.

Question 3-15: Referring to your conversion event, do you recall a point in time when you accepted and trusted in the truth that Jesus bodily rose from the grave, i.e., resurrection from death to life showing that His death on the cross was satisfactory payment for their sins so that you could have eternal life in Heaven?   Please explain your answer.

Question 3-16:  If you believe that you have never experienced a conversion event, do you understand the eternal ramifications if you physically died right now?  Please describe these ramifications.

Question 3-17:  Do you want God to save you right now?  If there is a facilitator or teacher of your class, please talk to them immediately.  If not, please pray the Sinner’s Prayer, meaning each word from the bottom of your heart. Then, talk to your Pastor or someone you know to be a Christian to discuss what you prayed.  Or contact us at the contact information set out above.

A Believer Has Knowledge of the Truth (On pages 133-135 of The Salvation Meter Book)

INTRODUCTION

Pages 133-135 of The Salvation Meter book describe the “A Believer has Knowledge of the Truth” test of salvation.  This test is in Chapter 6, which deals with a believer’s post-conversion spiritual condition.  This article at https://thesalvationmeter.com website is a revision of the discussion and questions in the book that pertain to this test of salvation.  There are two basic reasons I wrote this revision.

First, a sermon is never finished merely preached.  In the same way, there will always be ways to revise and improve the discussion of the “A Believer has Knowledge of the Truth” test of salvation.  Second, I hope this revision will assist anyone who reads, teaches or preaches, or merely considers the substance of this test to appreciate better the principles taught by this test of salvation. 

The “A Believer has Knowledge of the Truth” is a revealing test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  Here, in a broad sense, the truth is the fact that Jesus is the Christ.  In a more detailed sense, the truth comprises Christological facts that comprise those set forth on pages 42-68 of The Salvation Meter.  It is meaningful evidence of a lost condition if a person does not have knowledge of the truth.  On the other hand, it is meaningful evidence of salvation if a person has knowledge of the truth. 

REVISED DISCUSSION

1 John 2:18-21

The Apostle John presented the “A Believer has Knowledge of the Truth” test of salvation when he wrote 1 John 2:18–22 (ASV 1901), which reads:

18 Little children, it is the last hour: and as ye heard that antichrist cometh, even now have there arisen many antichrists; whereby we know that it is the last hour. 19 They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would have continued with us: but they went out, that they might be made manifest that they all are not of us. 20 And ye have an anointing from the Holy One, and ye know all things. 21 I have not written unto you because ye know not the truth, but because ye know it, and because no lie is of the truth. 22 Who is the liar but he that denieth that Jesus is the Christ? This is the antichrist, even he that denieth the Father and the Son.

John begins verse 20 by contrasting the lost people who left (see vv. 18-19) and the saved people in whom the Holy Spirit has taken up residency through Christ.  John then wrote that those indwelt by the Holy Spirit “know all things” (v. 20b) and “ye know” the truth (v. 21) about the fact that Jesus is the Christ.    

In verses 20-21, the ASV 1901 translates the three usages of the Greek verb oida as “ye know.”  Oida means to comprehend the meaning of something, with focus upon the resulting knowledge.  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). In Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 379). United Bible Societies.  In these three usages, oda is in the perfect tense which is the verb tense used by the writer to describe a completed verbal action that occurred in the past but which produced a state of being or a result that exists in the present (in relation to the writer). The emphasis of the perfect is not the past action so much as it is as such but the present “state of affairs” resulting from the past action.  See Heiser, M. S., & Setterholm, V. M. (2013; 2013). Glossary of Morpho-Syntactic Database Terminology. Lexham Press.  A believer has existing knowledge, and that knowledge is of the “truth.”

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun alētheia as “truth.”  The Logos 9 sense is gospel of Jesus ⇔ truth – the good news about Jesus Christ, especially as a message that conforms to (and answers) the nature of reality.  It means the content of that which is true and thus in accordance with what actually happened—‘truth.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 672.  In light of verse 22, the “truth” in its broader aspect is that Jesus is the Christ.  In a narrow aspct, the “truth” comprises Christological facts about Jesus.  Haas et al. (Haas, C., Jonge, M. de, & Swellengrebel, J. L. (1994). A handbook on the letters of John (p. 68)  United Bible Societies) writes:

For the truth see 1:6, but the reference here is to christological facts. This is shown by the next verse: the truth John’s readers know is the fact that Jesus is the Christ, as revealed in the Gospel.

Another commentator (Kruse, C. G. (2000). The letters of John (p. 104). W.B. Eerdmans Pub.; Apollos) agrees:

The truth to which the author refers in this context is the truth about Jesus Christ, that he is the Christ (Messiah), something the secessionists were denying and thus revealing themselves to be antichrists (2:22–23).

John taught that “no lie is of the truth,” which means if a teaching is true it comes from God.  If a teaching is false, it comes from the devil. Therefore, a believer can discern the truth that Jesus is the Christ. 

Expanding upon the truth that Jesus is the Christ, there are three Christological facts about the Person of Jesus Christ.  These three truths comprise the preexistence of Jesus Christ with God the Father, Jesus Christ is the “Son of God,” and Jesus is the Christ.  There are seven Christological truths about the role and work of Jesus Christ: (1) Jesus was sent into the world by God the Father, (2) Jesus came into the world to take away the sins of the world and destroy the works of the devil, (3) Jesus Christ had to 100% God and 100% human, (4) Jesus Christ had to live a sinless life, (5) Jesus Christ had to die a physical death, (6) Jesus Christ had to experience a physical, bodily resurrection from the dead, and (7) Jesus Christ had to ascend to God the Father.  Discussions of these Christological facts are on pages 42-68 of The Salvation Meter.

Conclusion

The “A Believer has Knowledge of the Truth” is a revealing test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  Here, in a broad sense, the truth is the fact that Jesus is the Christ.  In a more detailed sense, the truth comprises Christological facts that comprise those set forth on pages 42-68 of The Salvation Meter.  It is meaningful evidence of a lost condition if a person does not have knowledge of the truth.  On the other hand, it is meaningful evidence of salvation if a person has knowledge of the truth. 

QUESTIONS

1 John 2:18-21 teaches “A Believer has Knowledge of the Truth” test of salvation which raises the following questions for you to answer.  In answering these questions, please keep in mind the above three truths about the Person of Christ and the above seven truths about role and work of Jesus Christ.  There may be overlap between your following answers and those set forth with respect to the substance of a believer’s beliefs about Jesus Christ on pages 42-68 of the book.

Question 6-25:  What is your level of knowledge (e.g., excellent, good, fair, poor) about the truth that Jesus is the Christ?  Please explain your answer.  Are you satisfied with your current level of knowledge?  Please explain your answer.

Question 6-26:  Is your knowledge about the truth that Jesus is the Christ remaining the same, increasing, or decreasing?  Please explain your answer. 

Question 6-27:  Are you taking action to increase your knowledge about the truth that Jesus is the Christ?  Please explain your answers.

Question 6-28:  Do you believe you satisfy the “A Believer has Knowledge of the Truth” test of salvation?  Please explain your answer and include evidence that supports your answer.  Do you strongly agree, moderately agree, moderately disagree, strongly disagree or are neutral about the statement that you satisfy “A Believer has Knowledge of the Truth” test of salvation?  Please record your answer at Indicator 6-D of your Personal Salvation Assessment in the Appendix.

A Believer Has Been Given Understanding (On pages 130-133 of The Salvation Meter)

INTRODUCTION

Pages 130-133 of The Salvation Meter book describe the “A Believer Has Been Given Understanding” test of salvation.  This test is found in Chapter 6, which deals with a believer’s post-conversion spiritual condition.  This article at https://thesalvationmeter.com website is a revision of the discussion and questions in the book that pertain to this test of salvation.  There are two basic reasons I wrote this revision.

First, a sermon is never finished merely preached.  In the same way, there will always be ways to revise and improve the discussion of the “A Believer has Been Given Understanding” test of salvation.  Second, I hope this revision will assist anyone who reads, teaches, preaches, or merely considers the substance of this test to better appreciate the principles taught this test of salvation. 

The “A Believer Has Been Given Understanding” is a meaningful test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  A believer is given understanding so that they may know God the Father, who is true.  The much of the understanding a believer receives is through the menō (i.e., abiding) relationship between God and a believer.  It seems safe to say that the “A Believer has Been Given Understanding” test falls within the scope of the “A Believer Abides in God” test.  Yet, if a person has not been given understanding, it is indicative of a lost spiritual condition.  On the other hand, if a believer displays having been given understanding, it is evidence of salvation.

REVISED DISCUSSION

1 John 5:20

In 1 John 5:20 (ASV 1901), John set forth the “A Believer has been Given Understanding” test of salvation when he wrote:

20 And we know that the Son of God is come, and hath given us an understanding, that we know him that is true, and we are in him that is true, even in his Son Jesus Christ. This is the true God, and eternal life.

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb didōmi as “hath given.”  The Logos 9 sense is to grant a request – to allow someone to have what the person has requested.  It means to give an object, usually implying value—‘to give, giving.’  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). In Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 565). United Bible Societies.  Didōmi is in the perfect tense which is the verb tense used by the writer to describe a completed verbal action that occurred in the past but which produced a state of being or a result that exists in the present (in relation to the writer). The emphasis of the perfect is not the past action so much as it is as such but the present “state of affairs” resulting from the past action.  See Heiser, M. S., & Setterholm, V. M. (2013; 2013). Glossary of Morpho-Syntactic Database Terminology. Lexham Press.

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun dianoia as “an understanding.” The Logos 9 sense is disposition – a natural or acquired habit, feeling, or characteristic tendency in a person or thing.  It refers to the psychological faculty of understanding, reasoning, thinking, and deciding—‘mind.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, pp. 323–324.

The purpose of this Christ-given understanding is for a believer to continually “know” God the Father.  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb ginōskō as “we know” and typically means gaining knowledge through first-hand experience (e.g., observation or the senses).  See the Logos 9 sense.   One commentator (Kruse, C. G. (2000). The letters of John (p. 196). W.B. Eerdmans Pub.; Apollos) writes:

Two elements of the work of the Son of God are alluded to here, his coming as the historical Jesus, and his giving understanding to people when they became believers. The word translated ‘understanding’ (dianoia) is found only here in the Johannine writings, but the context makes its meaning clear enough: he has given us understanding so that we may know him who is true. The understanding which the Son of God gives is knowledge of God the Father himself.

Still, another commentator (Womack, M. M. (1998). 1, 2 & 3 John (1 Jn 5:20). College Press) writes:

In his concluding remarks, John hits repeatedly on the theme that the Christian has knowledge that is directly contradictory to the mystical knowledge the Gnostic claimed. Christ brought to us both understanding of God’s nature, and eternal life, because he not only came from God, but is the true God.

            The Amplified Translation (taken from preceptaustin.org) reads:

Amplified – And we [have seen and] know [positively] that the Son of God has [actually] come to this world and has given us understanding and insight [progressively] to perceive (recognize) and come to know better and more clearly Him Who is true; and we are in Him Who is true—in His Son Jesus Christ (the Messiah). This [Man] is the true God and Life eternal.

Wuest (Wuest, K. S. (1997). Wuest’s word studies from the Greek New Testament: for the English reader (Vol. 13, p. 184). Eerdmans) translates this verse as follows:

Translation. We know with an absolute knowledge that the Son of God has come and is here, and that He has given us a permanent understanding in order that we may be knowing in an experiential way the One who is genuine. And we are in the Genuine One, in His Son, Jesus Christ. This is the genuine God and life eternal.

            God has given a believer understanding (dianoia ) so they can better continuously know God the Father through experience over time.  It is apparent that this test of salvation relates to the “A Believer has Experiential Knowledge of God” test of salvation (pages 114-118 of The Salvation Meter).   

Conclusion

The “A Believer Has Been Given Understanding” is a meaningful test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  A believer is given understanding so that they may know God the Father, who is true.  The much of the understanding a believer receives is through the menō (i.e., abiding) relationship between God and a believer.  It seems safe to say that the “A Believer has Been Given Understanding” test falls within the scope of the “A Believer Abides in God” test.  Yet, if a person has not been given understanding, it is indicative of a lost spiritual condition.  On the other hand, if a believer displays having been given understanding, it is evidence of salvation.

QUESTIONS

1 John 5:20 presents the “A Believer has Been Given Understanding” test of salvation that generates the following questions for you to answer.

Question 6-21:  Do you have an understanding so that you know the true God?    How have you come to know the true God?  Would it include your ability to reason, think, and decide?  Would you please explain your answer?

Question 6-22:  While there may be stops and starts, would you say that overall you have come to know the true God better over time?  Please explain your answer.

Question 6-23:  What emotions, if any, are triggered when you ponder the fact that you have been given understanding whereby you have knowledge of the one true living God?  Are you appreciative of this gift?  Does your life reflect that you have knowledge of the true God?  Please explain your answer.

Question 6-24:  Do you believe you satisfy the “A Believer Has Been Given Understanding” test of salvation?  Please explain your answer and include evidence that supports your answer.  Do you strongly agree, moderately agree, moderately disagree, strongly disagree or are neutral about the statement that you satisfy the “A Believer Has Been Given Understanding” test of salvation?  Please record your answer at Indicator 6-C of your Personal Salvation Assessment in the Appendix

A Believer Possesses Spiritual Discernment (On pages 124-130 of The Salvation Meter)

INTRODUCTION

Pages 124-130 of The Salvation Meter book describe the “A Believer Possesses Spiritual Discernment” test of salvation.  Chapter 6, which deals with a believer’s post-conversion spiritual condition, contains this test..  This article at https://thesalvationmeter.com website is a revision of the discussion and questions in the book.  There are two basic reasons I wrote this revision.

First, a sermon is never finished, merely preached.  In the same way, there will always be ways to revise and improve the discussion of the “A Believer Possess Spiritual Discernment” test of salvation.  Second, I hope this revision will assist anyone who reads, teaches, preaches, or merely considers the substance of this test to appreciate better the principles taught in this test of salvation. 

The “A Believer Possesses Spiritual Discernment” is a revealing test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  Spiritual discernment increases the longer a believer is in the menō relationship with God. Therefore, it is evidence of a lost condition if a person does not possess spiritual discernment. But, on the other hand, it is evidence of salvation if a person possesses spiritual discernment.

REVISED DISCUSSION

Discussion of 1 John 4:1

When he wrote 1 John 4:1, the Apostle John presented the “A Believer Possesses Spiritual Discernment” test of salvation.  A believer possesses spiritual discernment to scrutinize whether teaching or doctrine comes from God.  In other words, a believer has sufficient spiritual discernment to ascertain if a teaching is consistent with the Bible.   1 John 4:1 (ASV 1901) reads:

1 Beloved, believe not every spirit, but prove the spirits, whether they are of God; because many false prophets are gone out into the world.

In verse 1, John gave his audience two commands and the underlying reason.  The underlying reason was numerous false prophets in the world vying for followers.  This condition exists in the 21st Century, where there is a lot of spiritual “noise” trying to divert believers from the truth and entice them to follow many lies. 

John first commanded his audience “believe not every spirit.”  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb pisteuō as “believe.”  It means to believe to the extent of complete trust and reliance—‘to believe in, to have confidence in, to have faith in, to trust, faith, trust.’  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). In Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 375). United Bible Societies.  The Logos 9 sense is to believe (trust) – to have faith; put one’s trust in something.  The verb is in the present tense, which is the verb tense where the writer portrays an action in process or a state of being with no assessment of the action’s completion.  See Heiser, M. S., & Setterholm, V. M. (2013; 2013). Glossary of Morpho-Syntactic Database Terminology. Lexham Press.   The verb is in the imperative mood which is the mood that normally expresses a command, intention, exhortation, or polite request.  Heiser et al. Id

When he wrote 1 John 4:1, John intended to convey to his audience that they were to continually not believe (i.e., trust or rely on) every spirit meaning every teacher or doctrine.  They were not to  be gullible and accept as true every slick teacher and fall into the error described by Paul in Ephesians 4:14, which falls within the block of text comprising Ephesians 4:11–14 (ASV 1901) [emphasis added]:

11 And he gave some to be apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; 12 for the perfecting of the saints, unto the work of ministering, unto the building up of the body of Christ: 13 till we all attain unto the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a fullgrown man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ: 14 that we may be no longer children, tossed to and fro and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, in craftiness, after the wiles of error;

To be tossed about here and there upon hearing every new doctrine paints a picture of being at the mercy of the waves of a strong storm.  It represents the result of spiritual instability, as well as spiritual immaturity. 

Because of the deceptiveness of “every wind of doctrine,” irreparable damage occurs to those who adopt a “theological flavor of the month” approach to spiritual matters.  A brief word study reveals the evilness of “every wind of doctrine” of Ephesians 4:14.

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun kybeia as “sleight.”  The Logos 9 sense is trickery ⇔ dice-playing – any type of misrepresentation intended to take advantage of a person in some way.  It means trickery that results from craftiness (κυβεία literally refers to dice playing)—‘trickery, craftiness.  See Louw et al. supra at Vol. 1, p. 759).  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun panourgia as “craftiness.”  It means trickery involving evil cunning—‘craftiness, treachery.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 770.  The Logos 9 sense is cunning – deceitfulness usually characterizing an especially wicked character. 

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun methodeia as “wiles.”  It means crafty scheming with the intent to deceive—‘deceit, scheming.  See Louw et al., supra at  Vol. 1, p. 759.  The Logos 9 sense is method – a way of doing something (deceptive), especially in a systematic way; implies an orderly logical arrangement (usually in steps).  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun planē as “of error.”  The Logos 9 sense is deception – a misleading falsehood.  It means (derivative of πλάνηa ‘to deceive,’ 31.8) the content of that which misleads or deceives—‘misleading belief, deceptive belief, error, mistaken view.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 366.

Paul’s use of methodeia and planē reveal the intentional deception on the part of the crafty tricksters who are kybeia and panourgia.  These people profess to proclaim the truth, but, in reality, advance false teaching.  These people are especially evil.

In 1 John 4:1, after giving his readers a negative command, John gave them the contrasting positive command to, “but prove the spirits.”  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek word alla as “but.”  Alla is an adversative conjunction which is a conjunction used to express contrast between the immediate clause and the one (“believe not every spirit”) preceding it.  See Lukaszewski, A. L. (2007). The Lexham Syntactic Greek New Testament Glossary. Lexham Press. 

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb dokimazō as “prove.”  It means to try to learn the genuineness of something by examination and testing, often through actual use—‘to test, to examine, to try to determine the genuineness of, testing.’  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 331.  The Logos 9 sense is to examine (check out) – to observe, check out, and look over carefully or inspect.  Like with pisteuō, dokimazō is in the present tense and imperative mood. 

By his second command, John intended to tell his audience that they were to continuously examine the substance of the teaching to see whether it came from God.  They were to examine or test or prove the spirits to ascertain their source by actual examination and testing like a metallurgist assaying metals to determine their purity.  John’s second command is along the line of Acts 17:11 (ASV 1901):

11 Now these were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of the mind, examining the Scriptures daily, whether these things were so.

If their analysis confirmed that God was the source of the teaching, then they were to accept it.  But, if their examination disproved the truth of the teaching, they were to reject it.  

Discussion of 1 John 4:6

            John elaborated on the “A Believer Possesses Spiritual Discernment” test of 1 John 4:1 by what he wrote in 1 John 4:6 (ASV 1901):

6 We are of God: he that knoweth God heareth us; he who is not of God heareth us not. By this we know the spirit of truth, and the spirit of error.

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb ginōskōas “he that knoweth.”  It means to indicate that one does know—‘to acknowledge.’  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 368.  The Logos 9 sense is know (experientially) – to know or have knowledge about (someone or something); normally as acquired through observation or the senses.  The verb is in the present tense.  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb akouō as “heareth.”  It means to believe something and to respond to it on the basis of having heard—‘to accept, to listen to, to listen and respond, to pay attention and respond, to heed.’  See Louw et al. supra at Vol. 1, p. 372.  The Logos 9 sense is to listen – to hear with intention. 

By 1 John 4:6a, John intended to convey to his audience that a saved person would accept the substance of what they (John et al.) were saying.  By 1 John 4:6b, John intended to convey to his audience that a lost person would not accept the substance of what they (John et al.) were saying. 

            The ASV 1901 translates the Greek preposition ek as “by.”  Here, ek is a preposition of means, which uses a preposition to express the means of an action.  See Lukaszewski, Id.  It functions as a marker of cause or reason, with focus upon the source—‘because of.  See Louw et a., supra at Vol. 1, p. 779.  John intended to tell his audience that those who accepted the message they were proclaiming could discern between “the spirit of truth, and the spirit of error.”

For a 21st Century believer, the reference to “us” in 1 John 4:6 correlates to the biblical authors of the Bible and those persons who accurately proclaim the Word of God.  To accept the biblically accurate means to believe the message and accept it and respond to it.  These actions demonstrate possession of spiritual discernment, and hence, salvation. 

To reject the biblically-accurate message reveals an absence of spiritual discernment, which indicates that a person is lost.  A lost person does not have the ears to hear.  Paul’s description of Israel in Romans 11:8 (ASV 1901) characterizes lost people in the 21st Century:

8 according as it is written, God gave them a spirit of stupor, eyes that they should not see, and ears that they should not hear, unto this very day.

The ability to discern allows a believer to know the source of a teaching.  Spiritual discernment is a revealing test of salvation because the substance of what a person believes very often reveals whether they are saved or lost.

Discussion of 1 John 2:26-27

The Apostle John again articulated the “A Believer Possesses Spiritual Discernment” test of salvation when he wrote 1 John 2:26–27 (ASV 1901):

26 These things have I written unto you concerning them that would lead you astray. 27 And as for you, the anointing which ye received of him abideth in you, and ye need not that any one teach you; but as his anointing teacheth you concerning all things, and is true, and is no lie, and even as it taught you, ye abide in him.

Verse 26 described a dangerous situation for John’s audience; namely, there were people “that would lead you astray.”  It was vital for his audience to realize that some people spoke lies and not biblical truth.  The same is true today.  Each believer must be on alert for those people who promote an unbiblical theology.  An evaluation of a teacher must include their practice of spiritual disciplines (e.g., Bible engagement, prayer, etc.).  Also, do these teachers treat people in a way consistent with biblical guidance?  

            In verse 27, the ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun chrisma as “anointing.”  It means (figurative extensions of meaning of χρίω and χρῖσμα ‘to anoint,’ not occurring in the NT) to assign a person to a task, with the implication of supernatural sanctions, blessing, and endowment—‘to anoint, to assign, to appoint, assignment, appointment.’  See Louw et al. supra at Vol. 1, p. 483.  The ASV 1901 translates the second occurrence of the Greek verb didaskō as “teachest.”  It means to provide instruction in a formal or informal setting—‘to teach, teaching.’  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 412. The Logos 9 sense is to teach and impart skills or knowledge.  Through verse 27, John counseled his audience that the indwelling of the Holy Spirit taught them the basics of the Christian faith.  Therefore, these believers possessed a spiritual filter (i.e., the Holy Spirit) to discern what was biblically true or false.  In other words, these believers possessed spiritual discernment.

The indwelling of the Holy Spirit does not mean that a person is to not listen to faithful teachers and pastors.  Otherwise, it would not make sense for there to be a calling of a teacher for the church per Ephesians 4:11 (ASV 1901), which reads:

11 And he gave some to be apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers;

To disregard a faithful teacher would run counter to the admonition of James 3:1–2 (ASV 1901) that teaching is a serious role in church:

1 Be not many of you teachers, my brethren, knowing that we shall receive heavier judgment. 2 For in many things we all stumble. If any stumbleth not in word, the same is a perfect man, able to bridle the whole body also.

1 John 2:26-27 should never be used to downplay Bible teaching because faithful teachers and Pastors can help a believer spiritually grow in many ways. 

Examples of Unbiblical Teaching

Possibly, the most common characteristic of false teaching is to undermine the authority of Scripture.  This error can deny the authority of parts or even all the Bible or advocate an additional source of truth.  It is error to contradict 2 Timothy 3:16–17 (ASV 1901), which reads:

16 Every scripture inspired of God is also profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for instruction which is in righteousness: 17 that the man of God may be complete, furnished completely unto every good work.

            In his book The Truth War – Fighting for Certainty in an Age of Deception [(2007), Thomas Nelson, Inc, Nashville, Tennessee 37214], Dr. John MacArthur discusses the religious movement called the “Emerging Church” (see pages ix-x) [italics in the original]:

Who would have thought that people claiming to be Christians – even pastors – would attack the very nature of truth? 

But they are.

A recent issue of Christianity Today featured a cover article about the “Emerging Church.”  That is a popular name for an informal affiliation of Christian communities worldwide who want to revamp the church, change the way Christians interact with their culture, and remodel the way we think about truth itself.

**

One dominant theme pervades the whole article: in the Emerging Church movement, truth (to whatever degree such a concept is even recognized) is assumed to be inherently hazy, indistinct, and uncertain – perhaps even ultimately unknowable.

Each of the Emerging Church leaders profiled in the article expressed a high level of discomfort with any hint of certainty about what the Bible means, even on something as basic as the gospel.

The gotquestions.org website (link: What is the emerging / emergent church movement? | GotQuestions.org ) discusses the emerging church movement:

False doctrine seems to abound within the emerging / emergent church movement, though, as stated previously, not within every group espousing emerging / emergent church beliefs. Because of this, care must be taken when deciding whether or not to become involved with an emergent church group. We all need to take heed of Matthew 7:15-20, “Watch out for false prophets. They come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ferocious wolves. By their fruit you will recognize them. Do people pick grapes from thorn bushes, or figs from thistles? Likewise every good tree bears good fruit, but a bad tree bears bad fruit. A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, and a bad tree cannot bear good fruit. Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. Thus, by their fruit you will recognize them.”

            Another church movement is the “progressive Christianity” movement.  The basic principles of the “progressive Christianity” movement are found at the website https://progressivechristianity.org/the-8-points/.  These eight points (2012 version) are:

One: Believe that following the path and teachings of Jesus can lead to an awareness and experience of the Sacred and the Oneness and Unity of all life;

Two: Affirm that the teachings of Jesus provide but one of many ways to experience the Sacredness and Oneness of life, and that we can draw from diverse sources of wisdom in our spiritual journey;

Three: Seek community that is inclusive of ALL people, including but not limited to:

Conventional Christians and questioning skeptics,

Believers and agnostics,

Women and men,

Those of all sexual orientations and gender identities,

Those of all classes and abilities:

Four: Know that the way we behave towards one another is the fullest expression of what we believe;

Five: Find grace in the search for understanding and believe there is more value in questioning than in absolutes;

Six: Strive for peace and justice among all people;

Seven: Strive to protect and restore the integrity of our Earth;

Eight: Commit to a path of life-long learning, compassion, and selfless love.

While they may use the word “Christianity,” in no way, shape, or form does the “progressive Christianity” movement encompass what the Bible teaches about salvation through repentance and trust in Christ’s finished work on the Cross.  The “progressive Christianity” movement does not promote biblical sexual morality. 

            Some who profess to be “Christian” use a flawed hermeneutic to justify their acceptance, and essentially, promotion of sin.  For example, the Rev. Adam Hamilton, the Pastor of a large UMC church that is pro-LGBTQ, presents a hermeneutical approach that pigeonholes Scripture into one of three “buckets.”  According to Rev. Hamilton, the three buckets into which Scripture falls are: (1) Scriptures that express God’s heart, character, and timeless will for human beings, (2) Scriptures that expressed God’s will in a particular time, but are no longer binding, and (3) Scriptures that never fully expressed the heart, character or will of God.  According to Hamilton, the issue about homosexual practice is “whether the handful of scriptures that condemn same-sex sexual activity belong to bucket one, two, or three.”  See his March 11, 2014 blog entitled “Homosexuality, The Bible, and the United Methodist Church” [ link: Homosexuality, The Bible, and The United Methodist Church · Blog from Author & Methodist Minister Adam Hamilton · Homosexuality, The Bible, and The United Methodist Church · Adam Hamilton].  

            Per Rev. Hamilton’s  April 27, 2016 post entitled “The Bible, Homosexuality., and the UMC – Part One” [link: https://www.adamhamilton.com/blog/the-bible-homosexuality-and-the-umc-part-one#.YeLFxNHMIdU], the pro-LGBTQ faction does not adopt an evangelical hermeneutical approach: 

But in truth, I don’t believe that we are picking and choosing. I think we’re appropriately interpreting; we’re asking the question, “What was the historical and cultural setting of these words, and do they appropriately express the heart of God for us today?” And how do Christians make that determination?  We consider the words and actions of Jesus, we think of what he described as the great commandments, and we consider the major themes of Scripture. Then we bring our intellect and experience of the Spirit to bear on our reading of Scripture.

Also, his book Making Sense of the Bible – Rediscovering the Power of Scripture Today advances the “three-bucket” approach.  In essence, the “three-bucket” approach permits a person to accept what parts of the Bible they like and discard what parts they do not like. 

A believer has sufficient spiritual discernment to recognize error of the magnitude of the errors practiced by the “Emerging Church,” “progressive Christianity”, and a church that adopts the “three bucket” approach.  These groups challenge, diminish or recast the Scripture to suit their needs.  These groups embody the “itching ears” mentality of 2 Timothy 4:3–4 (ASV 1901):

3 For the time will come when they will not endure the sound doctrine; but, having itching ears, will heap to themselves teachers after their own lusts; 4 and will turn away their ears from the truth, and turn aside unto fables.

If a person attends a church that challenges the authority of the Bible, and wants to remain, they ought to revisit their conversion.  No matter how many friends a believer has at such a church, spiritual discernment will motivate them to leave.    

Another common trait of unbiblical teaching is to boast about special revelation or secret truth.  Such “revelation” can take the form of a book in addition to the Bible and said to be on par with Scripture.  This “revelation” may be outside of the Bible like the “Book of Mormon,” or comprise a distorted corrupt interpretation of a biblical text.  No matter how it is packaged, such a false teaching contradicts biblical instruction and orthodox Christian doctrine.  Sometimes, it can move away from or diminish Jesus Christ per Colossians 2:8 (ASV 1901):

8 Take heed lest there shall be any one that maketh spoil of you through his philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ:

A believer must be careful not to be deceived by a teaching that requires works to be saved or keep one’s salvation.  For example, if water baptism is an absolute requirement for salvation, you are in the wrong church!  Instead, you need to move on to a church that teaches the truth about the gospel of Jesus Christ. Furthermore, to teach that water baptism is essential to salvation runs counter to the teaching of Ephesians 2:8–9 (ASV 1901), which reads:

8 for by grace have ye been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; 9 not of works, that no man should glory.

            Finally, the same warning exists with respect to groups that deny the Trinity.  These groups teach heresy about the very nature of God and contradict a plethora of passages that support the doctrine of the Trinity.  For example, the Trinitarian baptismal formula Jesus gave in the Great Commission per Matthew 28:18–20 (ASV 1901):

18 And Jesus came to them and spake unto them, saying, All authority hath been given unto me in heaven and on earth. 19 Go ye therefore, and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them into the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit: 20 teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I commanded you: and lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world.

The Apostle Paul described the Trinity in 1 Corinthians 12:4–6 (ASV 1901), which reads:

4 Now there are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit. 5 And there are diversities of ministrations, and the same Lord. 6 And there are diversities of workings, but the same God, who worketh all things in all.

            The Apostle Peter described the Trinity in 1 Peter 1:2 (ASV 1901):

2 according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, in sanctification of the Spirit, unto obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ: Grace to you and peace be multiplied.

            Jude described the Trinity when he wrote Jude 20–21 (ASV 1901):

20 But ye, beloved, building up yourselves on your most holy faith, praying in the Holy Spirit, 21 keep yourselves in the love of God, looking for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ unto eternal life.

A believer has spiritual discernment.  Spiritual discernment will motivate a genuine believer to depart from a church that denies the Trinity.  A person who remains at length in a church that denies the Trinity should revisit their conversion.

Conclusion

The “A Believer Possesses Spiritual Discernment” is a revealing test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  Spiritual discernment increases the longer a believer is in the menō relationship with God.  The Bible teaches that a believer has spiritual discernment to distinguish between biblically correct and incorrect theology. 

It is evidence of a lost condition if a person does not possess spiritual discernment.  On the other hand, it is evidence of salvation if a person possesses spiritual discernment.

QUESTIONS

The “A Believer Possesses Spiritual Discernment” test of salvation raises the following questions for you to answer. 

Question 6-12:  Can you recognize whether or not a theological doctrine is correct or in error?  Please explain your answer and describe the steps you take to evaluate a theological doctrine for biblical accuracy.

Question 6-12A:  Do you adhere to all of the following basic principles: (1) the Holy Scriptures are to be received as the authoritative Word of God, (2) that Scripture, having been given by divine inspiration, is infallible, so that, far from misleading us, it is true and reliable in all the matters it addresses, (3) that Scripture in its entirety is inerrant, being free from all falsehood, fraud, or deceit.  If you disagree with any one of those principles, please explain your answer.  Please include any sources you rely on to support your disagreement in your explanation.

Question 6-12B:  Do you (or did you ever) agree with the assumption that truth is inherently hazy, indistinct, and uncertain – perhaps even ultimately unknowable?  Please explain your answer.  Please include in your explanation the sources that support your answers

Question 6-12C:  Do you (or did you ever) possess a high level of discomfort with any hint of certainty about what the Bible means?  Please explain your answer.  Please include the source that helped or encouraged you to have a high level uncertainty in your explanation.

Question 6-12D:  Do you (or did you ever) agree with the totality of the eight points of “progressive Christianity?”  Please explain your answer.  Please include in your explanation the sources that support your answer.

Question 6-12E:  Do you (or did you ever) agree with the second point of “progressive Christianity:”

Affirm that the teachings of Jesus provide but one of many ways to experience the Sacredness and Oneness of life, and that we can draw from diverse sources of wisdom in our spiritual journey;

Please explain your answer.  Please include in your explanation the sources that support your answer. 

Question 6-12F:  Do you (or did you ever) agree with the “three bucket” approach as described above?  Please explain your answer.  Please include in your explanation the sources that support your answer. 

Question 6-12G:  Do you (or did you ever) believe that there is “special revelation” on par with Scripture that is outside of the Bible?  Please explain your answer.  Please include in your explanation the sources that support your answer. 

Question 6-12H:  Do you (or did you ever) believe that water baptism is absolutely necessary for a person to be saved?  Please explain your answer.  Please include in your explanation the source(s) from which you learned that water baptism is absolutely necessary for a person to be saved.

Question 6-12I:  Do you (or did you ever) reject the Trinity?  Please explain your answer.  Please include in your explanation the source(s) from which you learned that you should reject the Trinity. 

Question 6-13:  Have there been instances in your life in which you have encountered someone who you considered to be a false teacher?  Would you please explain your answer?

Question 6-14:  Did that false teacher have a good knowledge of the Bible?  Did that person have a surface knowledge or a proof-texting kind of knowledge of the Bible?  Would you please explain your answer.

Question 6-15:  What caused you to conclude that the person was a false prophet or teacher?  Please explain your answer and include a description of the steps you take to evaluate a Bible teacher.

Question 6-16:  Based upon your experience, what are the most common theological areas from which false teaching or doctrine arises?  Why do you think that is the case?  Please explain your answers.

Question 6-17:  What is the root cause of false teachers?  Please explain your answer.

Question 6-18:  In your experience, have you ever been deceived by a false teacher?  Describe the circumstances, including a description of how they gained your confidence and then how you came to realize that person was a false prophet.  What action did you take once you came to realize that person was a false prophet or teacher?  Please explain your answer.

Question 6-18A:  Are you a Mormon?  If you answered in the affirmative, do you believe you are saved?  If so, please explain why you believe you are saved?

Question 6-18B:  Are you a Jehovah’s Witness?  If you answered in the affirmative, do you believe you are saved?  If so, please explain why you believe you are saved?

Question 6-19:  When you first meet “religious” people, would you say you keep them at “arm’s length” until you can discern if they are from God?  What things cause a “red flag” to go up with respect to religious teachers or religious people in general?  Please explain your answer.

Question 6-20:  Are there any “hills to die on” you use to evaluate if a person is a false teacher?  Please describe those indicia.  Are some of the indicia weightier than others?  Please explain your answers.

Question 6-20:  Do you believe you satisfy the “A Believer Possesses Spiritual Discernment” test of salvation?  Please explain your answer and include evidence that supports your answer.  Do you strongly agree, moderately agree, moderately disagree, strongly disagree or are neutral about the statement that you satisfy “A Believer Possesses Spiritual Discernment” test of salvation?  Please record your answer at Indicator 6-B of your Personal Salvation Assessment in the Appendix.

A Believer Hungers and Thirst for God (Pages 120-124 of The Salvation Meter)

INTRODUCTION

Pages 120-124 of The Salvation Meter book describe the “A Believer Hungers and Thirsts for God” test of salvation.  This test is found in Chapter 6, which deals with a believer’s post-conversion spiritual condition.  This article at https://thesalvationmeter.com website is a revision of the earlier discussion and questions in the book that pertain to this test of salvation.  There are two basic reasons I wrote this revision.

First, a sermon is never finished merely preached.  In the same way, there will always be ways to revise and improve the discussion of the “A Believer Hungers and Thirsts for God” test of salvation.  Second, I hope this revision will assist anyone who reads, teaches, preaches, or merely considers the substance of this test to better appreciate the principles taught by this test of salvation. 

The “Believer Hungers and Thirsts for God” is a significant test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  While a believer’s “hunger and thirst” for God can be intangible, demonstrable evidence establishes the existence of such a hunger and thirst.  A person who does not have a hunger and thirst for God may very well be lost.  On the other hand, it is persuasive evidence of salvation if a person displays a hunger and thirst for God. 

REVISED DISCUSSION

Introduction

Most of us can recall something we hungered and thirsted after.  The object of our craving became a significant focus of our life.  I won a sectional qualifier many years ago to gain entrance in the USGA Mid-Amateur golf tournament.  It was a thrill to tee it up in a national-level competition on a golf course, the difficulty of which was over my head.  Even though I missed the cut to make match play, I left the tournament with a hunger and thirst for more tournament golf.  The following season I played in several events with less than stellar success. My enthusiasm waned so that my golf “career” became history.  Yet, I still recall my intangible hunger and thirst for more and more. 

Upon conversion, many things change between God and a believer.  One significant change is the existence of a menō (abiding) relationship between God and a believer.  See the “A Believer Abides in God” test of salvation on pages 106-110 of The Salvation Meter book.  The longer a believer abides in God, the greater their hunger and thirst for God should be. 

Upon conversion, there is fellowship between a believer and God the Father and God the Son that should bring about a desire to know God better.  In addition, God has done and still does so much for believers that their natural reaction is to want more of God.  God is infinite, so a believer’s quest to know better and want more of God is never-ending.  There will always be a need for God in a believer’s life that relates to the “A Believer Hungers and Thirsts for God” test of salvation. 

Psalm 42:1-2 and Psalm 63:1

The Psalmist focused on his craving for God when he wrote Psalm 42:1–2 (ASV 1901), which reads:

1 As the hart panteth after the water brooks, So panteth my soul after thee, O God. 2 My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: When shall I come and appear before God?

Psalm 42:1-2 described the Psalmist’s insatiable intensity for God.  The Psalmist wrote that his soul “panteth” after and “thirsteth” for God who is “the living God.”  The ASV 1901 translates both usages of the Hebrew verb ʿrg as “panteth.”  The Logos 9 sense is desire ⇔ pant – to strongly desire something, conceived of as panting.  Another way to characterize the verb s to long for.  The ASV 1901 translates the Hebrews verb ṣmʾ as “thirsteth.”  The Logos 9 sense is to yearn ⇔ thirst – to yearn for something, conceived of as thirsting for it.

            His metaphor that a deer pants for streams of water carries with it a picture of extreme thirst and desire.  For a thirsty deer, water was necessary to sustain life.  The Psalmist expressed his desire to “come and appear before God.”  He was willing to make the necessary effort to satisfy his hunger and thirst.  For the Psalmist, God was necessary to sustain his life.  A hunger and thirst for God is the natural consequence of knowing one’s desperate need for God.

David expressed a similar need for God when he wrote Psalm 63:1 (ASV 1901), which reads:

1 O God, thou art my God; earnestly will I seek thee: My soul thirsteth for thee, my flesh longeth for thee, In a dry and weary land, where no water is.

Looking at this verse, we first see that David characterized God as “my God,” reflecting his fellowship with God.  David wrote he shall seek God earnestly.  The ASV 1901 translates the Hebrew verb šḥr as “earnestly will I seek.”  The Logos 9 sense is seek – to try to get or reach something one desires.  His efforts to seek God were not half-hearted but earnest and intense.  David’s efforts to seek God were similar to the request in Psalm 42:2b of, “When shall I come and appear before God?” 

When David wrote, “My soul thirsteth for thee, my flesh longeth for thee” he referenced the entirety of his being.  His soul was his immaterial part, and his flesh was his material part. In his quest for God, David was going to “leave it all on the field.”  By acknowledging that he was in a dry and weary land where there was no water, David understood his vital need for God, i.e., spiritual nourishment.  He understood that only God could satisfy his need.  

For the 21st Century believer, God is essential to maintain their spiritual life so that they must hunger and thirst for God.  This is especially true because of the moral cesspool American society has become.

The Mindset of a Believer Per Matthew 5:6

            As a part of the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus used the expression “hunger and thirst” as recorded in Matthew 5:6 (ASV 1901), which reads:

6 Blessed are they that hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb peinaō as “they that hunger” and the Greek verb dipsaō as “thirst after.”  In reference to both usages, Louw et al. says they are, “figurative extensions of meaning of διψάωa ‘to thirst,’ 23.39, and πεινάωa ‘to hunger,’ 23.29) to have a strong desire to attain some goal, with the implication of an existing lack—‘to desire strongly.”  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). In Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 290). United Bible Societies.  Peinaō and dipsaō are in the present tense, the verb tense where the writer portrays an action in process or a state of being with no assessment of the action’s completion.  See Heiser, M. S., & Setterholm, V. M. (2013; 2013). Glossary of Morpho-Syntactic Database Terminology. Lexham Press.

The Greek noun διψάω (Louw et a. 23.29) means to be in a state of hunger, without any implications of particular contributing circumstances—‘to be hungry, to have hunger.  See Louw et al. supra at Vol. 1, p. 252. The Greek noun πεινάω (Louw et al. 23.39) means the state resulting from not having drunk anything for a period of time—‘to be thirsty, thirst.  See Louw et al. supra at Vol. 1, p. 253. 

            In this verse, the “hunger and thirst” is extreme which, in essence, equates to being insatiable.  Even though the “hunger and thirst” is after righteousness, it describes the mindset of a believer who has a hunger and thirst for God. 

Conclusion

It is in the DNA of a believer to want to know better the One through whom they received eternal life.  Each one of Psalm 42:1-2 and Psalm 63:1 articulates the yearning for God that a 21st Century believer ought to possess.  Matthew 5:6 enhances the description of what a believer’s hunger and thirst for God should look like.    

 Amos 8:11–13 (ASV 1901) describes the hopelessness of God’s silence:

11 Behold, the days come, saith the Lord Jehovah, that I will send a famine in the land, not a famine of bread, nor a thirst for water, but of hearing the words of Jehovah. 12 And they shall wander from sea to sea, and from the north even to the east; they shall run to and fro to seek the word of Jehovah, and shall not find it. 13 In that day shall the fair virgins and the young men faint for thirst.

One commentator discusses the hopelessness of receiving no word from God:

Worse than strong words of judgment from the Lord is no word from the Lord, an ominous and foreboding silence. To receive no word from God in response to cries for help meant that God had hidden his face from them, rejected and abandoned them to their enemies.

Smith, B. K., & Page, F. S. (1995). Amos, Obadiah, Jonah (Vol. 19B, p. 151). Broadman & Holman Publishers.

A believer should always want more of God.  Therefore, a believer’s hunger and thirst for God should be so extreme that they will “run to and fro to seek God.”

QUESTIONS

The “A Believer Hungers and Thirsts for God” test of salvation raises the following questions for you to answer.

Question 6-1:  What does the expression “hunger and thirst for God” mean to you?  Please explain your answer and include a description in concrete terms of the images that come to mind when you ponder the expression “hunger and thirst for God.”   You may consider the thirsty deer alongside a refreshing stream of water or the weary traveler in the desert who comes upon an oasis.  You may want to factor in a situation like my golfing exploits in which you experienced a huge desire for something. 

Question 6-2:  Do you hunger and thirst for God in the part of you that thinks, feels, and wills?  Is your hunger and thirst for God constant?  Would you please explain your answers?

Question 6-3:  When you hunger and thirst for God, do you describe God as “my God?”  Do you see God as your personal God?  Do you see your relationship with God as personal?  Would you please explain your answer.

Question 6-4:  Are you impatient to satisfy your hunger and thirst for God?  Would you please explain your answer.

Question 6-5:  Is your hunger and thirst for God increasing or decreasing or does it remain constant?  What factors cause your hunger and thirst for God to increase?  What factors cause your hunger and thirst for God to decrease?  Would you say it is normal for you to hunger and thirst for God to remain constant?  Would you please explain your answers.

Question 6-6:  Are you intentional about trying to satisfy your hunger and thirst for God?  Please explain your answer and include a description of actions you take or plan to take to satisfy your hunger and thirst for God.  Are you accountable to anyone to take these actions?

Question 6-7:  Do you feel closer to God when you try to satisfy your hunger and thirst?  Please explain your answer.

Question 6-8:  Do you experience a feeling of remoteness from God when you do not try to satisfy your hunger and thirst?  Please explain your answer.

Question 6-9:  Do you experience spiritual droughts?   Please explain your answer and include in your explanation a cause of the drought and a description of any steps you took (or take) to escape the drought. 

Question 6-10:  Do you experience spiritual monsoons?   Please explain your answer and include in your explanation a cause of the monsoon and a description of any steps you took (or take) to bring on the monsoon. 

Question 6-11:  Do you satisfy the “A Believer Hungers and Thirsts for God” test of salvation?  Please explain your answer and include evidence that supports your answer.  Do you strongly agree, moderately agree, moderately disagree, strongly disagree or are neutral about the statement that you satisfy “A Believer Hungers and Thirsts for God” test of salvation?  Please record your answer at Indicator 6-A of your Personal Salvation Assessment in the Appendix.

© Copyright 2021, 2022. Stephen T. Belsheim.  All Rights Reserved

A Believer has Experiential Knowledge of God (Pages 114-118 of The Salvation Meter)

INTRODUCTION

Pages 114-118 of The Salvation Meter book describe the “A Believer has Experiential Knowledge of God” test of salvation.  This article at https://thesalvationmeter.com website is a revision of the discussion and questions in the book that pertain to this test of salvation.  There are two basic reasons I wrote this revision.

First, a sermon is never finished, merely preached.  In the same way, there will always be ways to revise and improve the discussion of the “A Believer has Experiential Knowledge of God” test of salvation.  Second, I hope this revision will assist anyone who reads, teaches,  preaches, or merely considers this test’s substance to appreciate better the principles taught in this test of salvation. 

The “A Believer has Experiential Knowledge of God” is an important test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  Actions that demonstrate experiential knowledge of God emanate from the menō (i.e., abiding) relationship between God and a believer.  The longer and more intense the menō relationship, the deeper and more filling is a believer’s experiential knowledge of God. 

Even though the “A Believer has Experiential Knowledge of God” test falls within the scope of the “A Believer Abides in God” test, if a person does not have experiential knowledge of God, it is indicative of a lost spiritual condition.  On the other hand, if a believer displays experiential knowledge of God, it is persuasive evidence of salvation.

REVISED DISCUSSION

1 John 2:13c-14a

When he wrote 1 John 2:13a, c-14a (ASV 1901), the Apostle John set out the “A Believer has Experiential Knowledge of God” test of salvation: 

13a I write unto you, fathers, because ye know him who is from the beginning. … 13c I have written unto you, little children, because ye know the Father.  14a I have written unto you, fathers, because ye know him who is from the beginning.

            In verses 13a and 14a, John identified some in his audience as “fathers” who were people who were spiritually mature believers because “ye know him who is from the beginning.”  In verse 13c, John wrote to believers who were spiritually immature or young in the faith, i.e., “children,” because “ye know the Father.”  Spiritually immature believers need to grow spiritually.  The ASV 1901 translates these three usages of the Greek verb ginōskō as “ye know.”  In each usage, ginōskō is in the perfect verb tense, which is the verb tense used by the writer to describe a completed verbal action that occurred in the past, but which produced a state of being or a result that exists in the present (in relation to the writer).  The emphasis of the perfect tense is not the past action so much as it is the present “state of affairs” resulting from the past action.  See Heiser, M. S., & Setterholm, V. M. (2013; 2013). Glossary of Morpho-Syntactic Database Terminology.  Lexham Press.       

The Greek verb ginōskō means to possess information about—‘to know, know about, have knowledge of, be acquainted with, acquaintance.’  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 333).  New York: United Bible Societies.  “Little Kittel” (Kittel, G., Friedrich, G., & Bromiley, G. W. (1985). Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, Abridged in One Volume (p. 121-122). Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans) discusses the word group:

In general, the Christian view of knowledge follows closely that of the OT.  It involves obedient acknowledgment.  It is not a fixed possession.  It is a gift of grace that marks the Christian life (1 Cor. 1:5; 2 Cor. 8:7).  Practical interests are always implied.  Edification rather than learning is the main point (Rom. 15:14; 1 Cor. 14:6).  Reflective inquiry must be grounded in love and lead to right action (Phil. 1:9–10; Phlm. 6; Col. 1:9–10; 1 Pet. 3:7). … Thus knowledge is neither observation nor mystical vision; it comes to expression in acts.  Observing the commandments is a criterion of knowledge (1 Jn. 2:3ff.).

What John intended to convey to his audience (i.e., “fathers” and “children”) was that experiential knowledge about God that took place in the past still existed and remained important in the present.  A believer who has experiential knowledge of God reflects such experiential knowledge by their actions.  A believer’s experiential knowledge of God grows over time as a believer spiritually matures and experiences God’s intervention in their life more and more.  Over time, God proves Himself to be real and active in the life of a believer, and, in turn, a believer responds accordingly with more and more actions that are in greater obedience to God.

Specific Examples of Gaining Experiential Knowledge of God

Some teaching from the book by Blackaby et al. entitled Experiencing God [(1994) Broadman & Holman Publishers, Nashville, Tennessee) provides guidance to discover evidence that supports the condition that a believer has experiential knowledge of God.  Blackaby et al. lists seven realities of experiencing God, some of which are relevant to this test of salvation. 

One of these realities is that God is always at work around a believer.  God working around a believer can manifest itself in many ways.  In my opinion, the most significant way God works in a believer’s life is when He saves a believer, and during the process that leads up to the conversion event.  The Salvation Meter discusses a believer’s conversion event on pages 39-88.  The reader should refer to that discussion, especially the section entitled “The Irreducible Minimum of the Saving Gospel of Jesus Christ” on pages 72-77 of the book.

Every believer has experiential knowledge of God through their personal salvation by grace through faith in Jesus Christ, and not by works per Ephesians 2:8–9 (ASV 1901):

8 for by grace have ye been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; 9 not of works, that no man should glory.

Acts 9:1-19 records Paul’s dramatic conversion on the road to Damascus.  On more than one occasion, the Apostle Paul shared his testimony about his encounter with Jesus Christ.  See Acts 22:6-21 and Acts 26:12-18.  A believer demonstrates having experiential knowledge of God by testifying about their salvation experience.  I believe that every believer’s conversion is a miracle from God.

            About a believer’s conversion event, their experiential knowledge of God can manifest itself in several ways.  A believer’s experiential knowledge of God can manifest itself in a feeling of deep joy that a permanent relationship exists with God through His Son, Jesus Christ.  Along this line, a believer’s experiential knowledge of God can manifest itself in confidence that their eternal destiny is secure.  Further, a believer’s experiential knowledge of God can manifest itself in a relief they have been delivered from an eternity in hell.

All believers are not preachers in the sense of Ephesians 4:11–12 (ASV 1901):

11 And he gave some to be apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; 12 for the perfecting of the saints, unto the work of ministering, unto the building up of the body of Christ:

However, an integral part of a believer’s salvation testimony is their preaching of the saving gospel of Jesus Christ.  Paul commanded Timothy to preach the word in 2 Timothy 4:1–4 (ASV 1901), which reads:

1 I charge thee in the sight of God, and of Christ Jesus, who shall judge the living and the dead, and by his appearing and his kingdom: 2 preach the word; be urgent in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort, with all longsuffering and teaching.  3 For the time will come when they will not endure the sound doctrine; but, having itching ears, will heap to themselves teachers after their own lusts; 4 and will turn away their ears from the truth, and turn aside unto fables.

Preaching the gospel, i.e., carrying out evangelism in whatever form, is evidence a believer has experiential knowledge of God.  Proclaiming the saving gospel of Jesus Christ can take on many forms, such as, for example, verbally and in print. 

            A believer’s experiential knowledge of God can manifest itself in a desire to proclaim the gospel, praying that the Holy Spirit will convict the lost of their need of salvation, a desire to become better equipped to proclaim the gospel, and the exercise of actually proclaiming the saving gospel of Jesus Christ.  In addition, a believer’s experiential knowledge of God can manifest itself in telling others about what God has done in their life both at conversion and thereafter.

God works in a believer’s life in more ways than salvation.  A believer’s experiential knowledge of God includes the great things He has done and the mercy God has shown to them in instances in which Satan’s power has been broken.  Therefore, it is a natural reaction for a believer to tell others about their experiential knowledge of God as did the blind man whom Jesus healed when he said in John 9:25 (ASV1901), which reads:

25 He therefore answered, Whether he is a sinner, I know not: one thing I know, that, whereas I was blind, now I see.

John 9 records the entire account of Jesus healing the man who was born blind.

In the case of the demon-possessed man whom Jesus had healed, instead of allowing him to come with Him, Mark 5:18-19 (ASV1901) records that Jesus told him to report all that God had done:

18 And as he was entering into the boat, he that had been possessed with demons besought him that he might be with him.  19 And he suffered him not, but saith unto him, Go to thy house unto thy friends, and tell them how great things the Lord hath done for thee, and how he had mercy on thee.

It is biblical to tell others, “and tell them how great things the Lord hath done for thee, and how he had mercy on thee.”  The “great things the Lord hath done” category includes physical healing, emotional healing, guidance in financial issues, restoring marriages, and other relationships.  Evidence of experiential knowledge of God shows itself in a believer’s realization that the battle is spiritual per Ephesians 6:12 (ASV 1901):

12 For our wrestling is not against flesh and blood, but against the principalities, against the powers, against the world-rulers of this darkness, against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places.

            According to Blackaby et al., another reality of experiencing God is God invites a believer to become involved with Him in His work.  Sometimes, God’s calling can create a crisis of belief that requires faith and trust in God.  God’s calling in life often requires the believer to make life-changing actions. 

The Bible describes several instances in which Jesus called His disciples resulting in life-changing action.  For example, Jesus called Peter and Andrew and James and John, and all of these straightway (or immediately) left their vocation.  Matthew 4:18-22 (ASV1901) reads:

18 And walking by the sea of Galilee, he saw two brethren, Simon who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they were fishers.  19 And he saith unto them, Come ye after me, and I will make you fishers of men.  20 And they straightway left the nets, and followed him.  21 And going on from thence he saw two other brethren, James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother, in the boat with Zebedee their father, mending their nets; and he called them.  22 And they straightway left the boat and their father, and followed him.

Jesus called Levi (Matthew) and he left his vocation to follow Jesus.  Luke 5:27-28 (ASV 1901) reads:

27 And after these things he went forth, and beheld a publican, named Levi, sitting at the place of toll, and said unto him, Follow me.  28 And he forsook all, and rose up and followed him.

            Jesus’ calling of Paul was a dramatic event that turned Paul’s life upside down.  At first his calling was a painful experience.  Acts 9:3-9 (ASV 1901) reads:

3 And as he journeyed, it came to pass that he drew nigh unto Damascus: and suddenly there shone round about him a light out of heaven: 4 and he fell upon the earth, and heard a voice saying unto him, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me?  5 And he said, Who art thou, Lord?  And he said, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest: 6 but rise, and enter into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do.  7 And the men that journeyed with him stood speechless, hearing the voice, but beholding no man.  8 And Saul arose from the earth; and when his eyes were opened, he saw nothing; and they led him by the hand, and brought him into Damascus.  9 And he was three days without sight, and did neither eat nor drink.

Jesus’ calling of Ananias at first, created much angst in Ananias’ life per Acts 9:10-19 (ASV 1901):

10 Now there was a certain disciple at Damascus, named Ananias; and the Lord said unto him in a vision, Ananias.  And he said, Behold, I am here, Lord. 11 And the Lord said unto him, Arise, and go to the street which is called Straight, and inquire in the house of Judas for one named Saul, a man of Tarsus: for behold, he prayeth; 12 and he hath seen a man named Ananias coming in, and laying his hands on him, that he might receive his sight.  13 But Ananias answered, Lord, I have heard from many of this man, how much evil he did to thy saints at Jerusalem: 14 and here he hath authority from the chief priests to bind all that call upon thy name.  15 But the Lord said unto him, Go thy way: for he is a chosen vessel unto me, to bear my name before the Gentiles and kings, and the children of Israel: 16 for I will show him how many things he must suffer for my name’s sake.  17 And Ananias departed, and entered into the house; and laying his hands on him said, Brother Saul, the Lord, even Jesus, who appeared unto thee in the way which thou camest, hath sent me, that thou mayest receive thy sight, and be filled with the Holy Spirit.  18 And straightway there fell from his eyes as it were scales, and he received his sight; and he arose and was baptized; 19 and he took food and was strengthened.  And he was certain days with the disciples that were at Damascus.

But, in the face of his anxiety, Ananias trusted Jesus and did what Jesus instructed him to do. 

A believer’s obedience to God’s calling to work with Him demonstrates that the believer has experiential knowledge of God.  This is especially the case in difficult circumstances.  A believer’s experiential knowledge of God can manifest itself in recalling instances in which God called them, and they responded even in the face of angst and trembling.

            Another reality is that God speaks to a believer by the Holy Spirit through the Bible, prayer, circumstances and the church to reveal Himself, His purposes, and His ways.  Acts 13:2-3 (ASV 1901) reveals that the Holy Spirit set apart Paul and Barnabus for God’s work:

2 And as they ministered to the Lord, and fasted, the Holy Spirit said, Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them.  3 Then, when they had fasted and prayed and laid their hands on them, they sent them away.

            Acts 10:9-48 records the events connected with the Holy Spirit directing Peter to his encounter with Cornelius.  As reported in Acts 10:13-16 (ASV 1901), Peter was reluctant to obey what God showed his in the vision:

13 And there came a voice to him, Rise, Peter; kill and eat.  14 But Peter said, Not so, Lord; for I have never eaten anything that is common and unclean.  15 And a voice came unto him again the second time, What God hath cleansed, make not thou common.  16 And this was done thrice: and straightway the vessel was received up into heaven.

However, after he had pondered the vision, he obeyed the command from the Holy Spirit as described in Acts 10:19-20, 23b (ASV 1901):

19 And while Peter thought on the vision, the Spirit said unto him, Behold, three men seek thee.  20 But arise, and get thee down, and go with them, nothing doubting: for I have sent them. …  23b And on the morrow he arose and went forth with them, and certain of the brethren from Joppa accompanied him.

The result was all those who heard Peter’s message were saved as recorded in Acts 10:44-46 (ASV 1901):

2 And as they ministered to the Lord, and fasted, the Holy Spirit said, Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them.  3 Then, when they had fasted and prayed and laid their hands on them, they sent them away.

Instances in which a believer has sensed and obeyed the calling of the Holy Spirit demonstrate that they have experiential knowledge of God.  The Holy Spirit uses Bible engagement, prayer, circumstances, and other believers in the church body to provide guidance, i.e., a sense of what to do or a direction in which to head, to a believer.

            Even though there is overlap with the A Believer Experiences Answered Prayers” test of salvation on pages 204-206 of The Salvation Meter book, answered prayer demonstrates that a believer has experiential knowledge of God.  For example, Luke 2:25–32 (ASV 1901) describes how God answered Simeon’s prayer of “I want to see Jesus!”  This passage reads:

25 And behold, there was a man in Jerusalem, whose name was Simeon; and this man was righteous and devout, looking for the consolation of Israel: and the Holy Spirit was upon him.  26 And it had been revealed unto him by the Holy Spirit, that he should not see death, before he had seen the Lord’s Christ.  27 And he came in the Spirit into the temple: and when the parents brought in the child Jesus, that they might do concerning him after the custom of the law, 28 then he received him into his arms, and blessed God, and said, 29 Now lettest thou thy servant depart, Lord, According to thy word, in peace; 30 For mine eyes have seen thy salvation, 31 Which thou hast prepared before the face of all peoples; 32 A light for revelation to the Gentiles, And the glory of thy people Israel.

The scope of an “I want to see Jesus” prayer can be broad.  A believer’s experiential knowledge of God can manifest itself in answers to their “I want to see Jesus” prayers.

Another way a believer’s experiential knowledge of God comes is through God-given comfort in trying circumstances.  A believer can pass along comfort to others consistent with what Paul wrote in 2 Corinthians 1:3–4 (ASV 1901):

3 Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort; 4 who comforteth us in all our affliction, that we may be able to comfort them that are in any affliction, through the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God.

During my first wife’s cancer ordeal, God gave each of us comforts daily.  Even when the doctor’s reports were discouraging, God still gave us His peace that passed all understanding per Philippians 4:7 (ASV 1901), which reads:

7 And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall guard your hearts and your thoughts in Christ Jesus.

Both of us gained experiential knowledge of God through this terrible situation.    Many times I have recounted the daily, hourly, and even the minute-by-minute grace God gave us to persevere through those thirty-three months from the metastasis to her passing in May of 2001 to be in the presence of her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.  God dispenses grace during a tsunami, and this is evidence that a believer has experiential knowledge of God.

            Experiential knowledge of God can come during times of physical loss.  Job suffered devastating losses as described in Job 1:13-19. Yet, even amid such significant loss, Job remained faithful to God per Job 1:20-22 (ASV 1901):

20 Then Job arose, and rent his robe, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped; 21 and he said, Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return thither: Jehovah gave, and Jehovah hath taken away; blessed be the name of Jehovah.  22 In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly.

While our loss was nothing of the magnitude of Job’s, my wife Sharon and I experienced significant flood damage to our home during the 2010 floods in middle Tennessee.  Amid the damage, we saw God work in tangible ways through unsolicited help from strangers and those in neighboring communities. 

One demonstration of a believer having experiential knowledge of God is through contentment in all situations like what Paul wrote in 2 Corinthians 12:10 (ASV 1901):

10 Wherefore I take pleasure in weaknesses, in injuries, in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses, for Christ’s sake: for when I am weak, then am I strong.

            A believer’s attitude toward God can be demonstrative evidence they have experiential knowledge of God.   For example, in 1 Peter 2:17 (ASV 1901), the Apostle Peter wrote that a believer should fear God:

17 Honor all men.  Love the brotherhood.  Fear God.  Honor the king.

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb phobeō as “fear.”  It means to have profound reverence and respect for deity, with the implication of awe bordering on fear—‘to reverence, to worship.  See Louw et al. supra at Vol. 1, p. 539). It is in the present verb tense which is the verb tense where the writer portrays an action in process or a state of being with no assessment of the action’s completion.  See Heiser et al., Id.  Little Kittel (Kittel et al. supra at p. 1275) reads:

The NT opposes all hampering anxiety but relates fear of God to faith as total trust.

A believer who stands in awe of God presents evidence that they have experiential knowledge of God.  Along this line, a believer who demonstrates total trust in God shows they have experiential knowledge of God.  To practice trust in God to provide demonstrates that a believer has experiential knowledge of God. 

            A believer who draws near to God demonstrates experiential knowledge of God.   Hebrews 10:19-22 (ASV 1901) teaches that a believer should draw near to God:

19 Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holy place by the blood of Jesus, 20 by the way which he dedicated for us, a new and living way, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh; 21 and having a great priest over the house of God; 22 let us draw near with a true heart in fulness of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience: and having our body washed with pure water,

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb proserchomai as “let us draw near.”  It means to move toward a reference point, with a possible implication in certain contexts of a reciprocal relationship between the person approaching and the one who is approached.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 191.  Proserchomai is in the present tense, which is the tense where the writer portrays an action in process or a state of being with no assessment of the action’s completion.  See Heiser et al., Id

James 4:8 (ASV 1901) also teaches that a believer is to draw near to God:

8 Draw nigh to God, and he will draw nigh to you.  Cleanse your hands, ye sinners; and purify your hearts, ye doubleminded.

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb engizō as “draw nigh” and it means to move nearer to a reference point—‘to draw near, to come near, to approach.  See Louw et al. supra at Vol. 1, p. 191.  It is in the aorist verb tense which is used by the writer to present the action of a verb as a “snapshot” event.  The verb’s action is portrayed simply and in summary fashion without respect to any process.  See Heiser et al. Id.  The second usage of engizō (he will draw nigh”) is in the future tense.  Lea (Lea, T. D. (1999). Hebrews, James (Vol. 10, p. 321). Broadman & Holman Publishers) described drawing near to God:

Come near to God involves approaching God in worship and commitment.  Those who approach God in the obedience of worship find that he comes near to them.  As our knowledge of the Lord deepens, we learn more fully his strength, power, and guidance for godly living.

To draw near to God by confession, repentance, worship, and with an undivided heart demonstrates that a believer has experiential knowledge of God.

Conclusion

Gaining experiential knowledge about God is a lifelong process that begins at salvation and continues forever.  The “A Believer has Experiential Knowledge of God” is an important test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  Actions that demonstrate experiential knowledge of God emanate from the menō (i.e., abiding) relationship between God and a believer. 

The “A Believer has Experiential Knowledge of God” test falls within the scope of the “A Believer Abides in God” test.  Even so, if a person does not have experiential knowledge of God, it is indicative of a lost spiritual condition.  On the other hand, if a believer displays evidence of experiential knowledge of God, it is persuasive evidence of salvation.

QUESTIONS

The “A Believer has Experiential Knowledge of God” test of salvation raises the following questions for you to answer.

Question 5-22:  Have you experienced God working in your life?  Please explain your answer.  In your explanation, please include a description of some of the more memorable events in which God worked in your life. 

Question 5-22A:  Have you experienced God working in your life through your conversion event, as well as during the process that led up to your conversion event?  Please explain your answer and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22B:  Have you demonstrated having experiential knowledge of God by testifying about your salvation experience, i.e., conversion event and process leading up to your conversion?  Please explain your answer and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22C:  Have you experienced God working in your life through a feeling of deep joy caused by your permanent relationship that exists with God through His Son, Jesus Christ?  Have you experienced God working in your life through the confidence that you feel because your eternal destiny is secure?  Have you experienced God working in your life through the sense of relief you possess knowing that you have been delivered from an eternity in hell?  Please explain your answers and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22D:  Have you experienced God working in your life through a desire to proclaim the saving gospel of Jesus Christ?  Do you pray that the Holy Spirit will convict lost of their need for Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior?  Do you have a desire to become better equipped to proclaim the gospel?  Do you actually proclaim the saving gospel of Jesus Christ?  Please explain your answers and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22E:  Have you experienced God working in your life through your desire to tell others about what God has done in you after your conversion?  Please explain your answer and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22F:  Have you experienced God working in your life through a desire to tell others about “the great things” God has done for you?  Do the “great things” include instances in which Satan;s power has been broken?  Do you act on that desire to tell others?  Please note that the “great things the Lord hath done” category includes physical healing, emotional healing, guidance in financial issues, restoring marriages, and other relationships.  Do you appreciate that the battle is spiritual?  Please explain your answer and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22G:  Have you experienced God working in your life through your obedience to God’s calling on your life?  Has God called you to carry out an assigned task under difficult circumstances?  Can you recall instances in which you obeyed even in the face of angst and trembling?  Please explain your answers and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22H:  Have you experienced God working in your life through instances in which you sensed and obeyed the calling of the Holy Spirit?  Please keep in mind that the Holy Spirit uses Bible engagement, prayer, circumstances, and other believers in the church body to provide guidance, i.e., a sense of what to do or a direction in which to head, to a believer.  Please explain your answer and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22I:  Have you experienced God working in your life through answers to your “I want to see Jesus” prayers?  Please explain your answer and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22J:  Have you experienced God working in your life through experiencing God-given comfort in trying circumstances such as, for example, the death of a loved one, physical loss, emotional turmoil, and the like?  Please explain your answer and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22K:  Have you experienced God working in your life by experiencing God-given contentment in all situations?  Please explain your answer and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22L:  Typically, please describe your overall attitude towards God?  Does it change depending upon the circumstances?  Please explain your answers and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22M:  Have you experienced God working in your life through your awe of God you experience when you stand before Him?  For example, do you experience the awe and greatness of God when you pray or when you engage the Bible?  Please explain your answers and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22N:  Have you experienced God working in your life through placing your total trust in Him?  Is it your standard practice to trust in God in all circumstances?  Please explain your answer and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

Question 5-22O:  Have you experienced God working in your life through your drawing near to God?  Do you experience drawing near to God through confession, repentance, worship, and with an undivided heart?  Please explain your answers and include a discussion of any noteworthy events.

 Question 5-23:  How does it make you feel that God acts in your life so that you gain experiential knowledge about Him?  Keep in mind that God created the heavens and the earth and all that is in them.  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-24:  Are you excited that you experientially know the attributes of God as revealed in Scripture?  Do you appreciate all that Scripture reveals about God is true?  Does that cause you to want to increase your level (quality and quantity) of Bible engagement?  Please explain your answers.

Question 5-25:  Does the fact that you experientially know God cause you to experience joy or cause you to feel a sense of importance?   Please explain your answer and include a description of any other emotions or feelings that stem from the fact that you experientially know God. 

Question 5-26:  Do you have a desire to know God more deeply throughout the rest of your life?  What are your motivations for wanting to know God more deeply?  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-27:  What do you plan to do to deepen your knowledge of God?  When will you begin?  Please explain your answers and include a description of any accountability mechanisms in place.

Question 5-28:  Do you believe you satisfy the “a believer has experiential knowledge of God” test of salvation?  Please explain your answer and include evidence that supports your answer.  Do you strongly agree, moderately agree, moderately disagree, strongly disagree or are neutral about the statement that you satisfy “A Believer has Experiential Knowledge of God” test of salvation?  Please record your answer at Indicator 5-C of your Personal Salvation Assessment in the Appendix.

© Copyright 2021, 2022. Stephen T. Belsheim.  All Rights Reserved

A Believer has Biblical Fellowship (original found on pages 110-114)

INTRODUCTION

Pages 110-114 of The Salvation Meter book describe the “A Believer has Biblical Fellowship” test of salvation.  This article at https://thesalvationmeter.com website is a revision of the earlier discussion and questions in the book that pertain to this test of salvation.  There are two basic reasons I wrote this revision.

First, a sermon is never finished, merely preached.  In the same way, there will always be ways to revise and improve the discussion of the “A Believer has Biblical Fellowship” test of salvation.  Second, I hope this revision will assist anyone who reads, teaches, preaches, or merely considers the substance of this test to appreciate better the principles taught by this test of salvation. 

The “A Believer has Biblical Fellowship” is an important test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  Actions that demonstrate biblical fellowship emanates from the menō (i.e., abiding) relationship between God and a believer.  This means that the existence of an abiding relationship between God and a believer fosters biblical fellowship.  It seems, therefore, that the “A Believer has Biblical Fellowship” test falls within the scope of the “A Believer Abides in God” test.  Even so, if a person does not have biblical fellowship, it is indicative of a lost spiritual condition.  On the other hand, if a believer displays evidence biblical fellowship, it is persuasive evidence of salvation.

One important point to note is that a demonstration of the absence of biblical koinōnia can exist in the case of a person who claims to be a believer being in partnership with something that falls within the scope of “iniquity” or “darkness.”  

REVISED DISCUSSION

1 John 1:3 and 1 John 1:6-7

1 John 1:3 (ASV 1901, which presents the “A Believer has Biblical Fellowship” test of salvation, reads:

3 that which we have seen and heard declare we unto you also, that ye also may have fellowship with us: yea, and our fellowship is with the Father, and with his Son Jesus Christ:

This test teaches that a believer has “fellowship” with other believers and with God the Father and with God the Son.  1 John 1:3 (ASV 1901) resides within the block of 1 John 1:1–4 (ASV 1901), which reads:

1 That which was from the beginning, that which we have heard, that which we have seen with our eyes, that which we beheld, and our hands handled, concerning the Word of life 2 (and the life was manifested, and we have seen, and bear witness, and declare unto you the life, the eternal life, which was with the Father, and was manifested unto us); 3 that which we have seen and heard declare we unto you also, that ye also may have fellowship with us: yea, and our fellowship is with the Father, and with his Son Jesus Christ: 4 and these things we write, that our joy may be made full.

The Apostle John reinforced the “test” nature of biblical fellowship when he wrote 1 John 1:6–7 (ASV 1901), which reads:

6 If we say that we have fellowship with him and walk in the darkness, we lie, and do not the truth: 7 but if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus his Son cleanseth us from all sin.

One cannot have biblical fellowship if they walk in the darkness.  Yet, to walk in the light, demonstrates the presence of biblical fellowship. 

The key word to understanding these verses is the meaning of the Greek noun koinōnia, which the ASV 1901 translates as “fellowship.” The word koinōnia means an association involving close mutual relations and involvement—‘close association, fellowship.’  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). In Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 445).  United Bible Societies.  Arndt et al. (Arndt, W., Danker, F. W., Bauer, W., & Gingrich, F. W. (2000). In A Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament and other early Christian literature (3rd ed., p. 552). University of Chicago Press) describes koinōnia as a close association involving mutual interests, sharing, communion, close relationship attitude of good will that manifests an interest in a close relationship, generosity, fellow-feeling, altruism, proof of brotherly unity, and contribution  of gifts. 

Another way to look at koinōnia is it represents a sense of brotherhood.  One analogy is the bond of fellowship between soldiers who have been through war together.  It is a “Band of Brothers” mentality.  There is a sense of partnership in the proclamation of the saving gospel of Jesus Christ.  One translation handbook (Haas, C., Jonge, M. de, & Swellengrebel, J. L. (1994).  A handbook on the letters of John (p. 18). United Bible Societies) suggests descriptions for koinōnia such as friendship, unity, being together, eating together, “eating out of one dish,”being of the same heart, and being of the same mind. 

Koinōnia has a spiritual component and a temporal component.  The spiritual component pertains to fellowship between God and a believer.  The temporal component concerns mutual fellowship between believers.

Guidance from “Little Kittel”

The Little Kittel theological dictionary (Kittel, G., Friedrich, G., & Bromiley, G. W. (1985). Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, Abridged in One Volume (pp. 448–450). Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans) helps expand upon the concept of biblical fellowship.  Takeaways from discussing the usages of the relevant word group in the New Testament are below.

First, koinōnia with God comes only by faith.  Faith is a present possession of a believer, and is something that will reach consummation per 1 Thessalonians 4:16–17 (ASV 1901):

16 For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven, with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first; 17 then we that are alive, that are left, shall together with them be caught up in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord.

Second, taking of the Lord’s Supper is a demonstration of fellowship.  1 Corinthians 10:16 (ASV 1901) reads:

16 The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not a communion of the blood of Christ?  The bread which we break, is it not a communion of the body of Christ?

Third, koinōnia with Christ means a life that experiences suffering.  It is also a life that expectantly awaits  sharing in Christ’s glory per Philippians 3:9–10 (ASV 1901):

9 and be found in him, not having a righteousness of mine own, even that which is of the law, but that which is through faith in Christ, the righteousness which is from God by faith: 10 that I may know him, and the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings, becoming conformed unto his death;

Fourth, fellowship includes sharing with other believers over a wide range of things.  For example, Romans 15:27 (ASV 1901) identifies sharing of material things:

27 Yea, it hath been their good pleasure; and their debtors they are.  For if the Gentiles have been made partakers of their spiritual things, they owe it to them also to minister unto them in carnal things.

Sharing, especially material things, requires a mindset that esteems others above oneself.  See Mounce’s Complete Expository Dictionary of New & Old Testament Words, (2016), at p. 247, Zondervan, Grand Rapids, MI. 

According to Philippians 1:7 and 4:14 (ASV 1901), fellowship includes sharing in each other’s sufferings and each other’s grace:

[Philippians 1:7 (ASV 1901)] 7 even as it is right for me to be thus minded on behalf of you all, because I have you in my heart, inasmuch as, both in my bonds and in the defence and confirmation of the gospel, ye all are partakers with me of grace.  … [Philippians 4:14 (ASV 1901)] 14 Howbeit ye did well that ye had fellowship with my affliction.

Philippians 1:3-10

Paul used the word koinōnia in the sense of partnering in the proclamation of the saving gospel of Jesus when he wrote Philippians 1:3-10 (ASV 1901).  The ASV 1901 translates koinōnia as “partnership” in verse 5.  This passage (verses 3-10) reads:

3 I thank my God upon all my remembrance of you, 4 always in every supplication of mine on behalf of you all making my supplication with joy, 5 for your fellowship in furtherance of the gospel from the first day until now; 6 being confident of this very thing, that he who began a good work in you will perfect it until the day of Jesus Christ: 7 even as it is right for me to be thus minded on behalf of you all, because I have you in my heart, inasmuch as, both in my bonds and in the defence and confirmation of the gospel, ye all are partakers with me of grace.  8 For God is my witness, how I long after you all in the tender mercies of Christ Jesus.  9 And this I pray, that your love may abound yet more and more in knowledge and all discernment; 10 so that ye may approve the things that are excellent; that ye may be sincere and void of offence unto the day of Christ;

            Indicia of koinōnia between believers includes loving one another, praying for one another, helping one another proclaim the saving gospel of Jesus Christ, encouraging one another to grow in spiritual insight and discernment, and having a heartfelt concern for the sanctification of one another.  For this passage, the Logos 9 sense of koinōnia is the act of sharing in the activities or privileges of an intimate association or group such as, for example, marriage and churches. 

Opposites Cannot have Biblical koinōnia

            Paul made it clear when he wrote 2 Corinthians 6:14 (ASV 1901) that biblical fellowship cannot exists between opposites:

14 Be not unequally yoked with unbelievers: for what fellowship have righteousness and iniquity?  or what communion hath light with darkness?

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun metochē as “fellowship.”  It means a relationship involving shared purposes and activity.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 446.   A shared purpose or activity cannot exist between righteousness and iniquity which are opposite in their very natures.  Note that the ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun dikaiosynē as “righteousness,” and it means the act of doing what God requires.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 743).  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun anomia as “iniquity,” meaning to behave with complete disregard for the laws or regulations of a society—‘to live lawlessly, lawless living.’ See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 757.

The ASV 1901 translates koinōnia as “communion.”  There is no way koinōnia can exist between light and darkness, which are completely opposite concepts.   The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun  phōs as “light,” and it means light, in contrast with darkness (σκότοςa, σκοτίαa, 14.53), usually in relationship to some source of light such as the sun, moon, fire, lamp, etc.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 172. The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun skotos as “darkness,” meaning a condition resulting from the partial or complete absence of light.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 175.

A demonstration of the absence of biblical koinōnia can exist in the case of a person who claims to be a believer being in partnership with something that falls within the scope of “iniquity” or “darkness.”  The scope of such a “partnership” can be broad to encompass people, social activities, business activities, and the like. 

Conclusion

The “A Believer has Biblical Fellowship” is an important test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  Actions that demonstrate biblical fellowship emanate from the menō (i.e., abiding) relationship between God and a believer.  Such a menō relationship results in biblical fellowship. 

Therefore, the “A Believer has Biblical Fellowship” test essentially falls within the scope of the “A Believer Abides in God” test of salvation.  It is strong evidence of a lost condition if a person does not have biblical fellowship.  On the other hand, it is persuasive evidence of salvation if a person demonstrates biblical fellowship.

One important point to note is that a demonstration of the absence of biblical koinōnia can exist in the case of a person who claims to be a believer being in partnership with something that falls within the scope of “iniquity” or “darkness.”  

QUESTIONS

The “A Believer has Biblical Fellowship” test of salvation raises the following questions for you to answer.

Question 5-11:  Do you have or have you had any relationships with other believers that you consider to be within the category of biblical koinōnia?   Would you please explain your answer in detail?  In formulating your response, please keep in mind the following characteristics of koinōnia: close associations involving mutual interests and sharing, association, communion, partnership, friendship, unity, being together, eating together, “eating out of one dish,” and being of the same heart, and being of the same mind, loving one another, praying for one another, helping one another proclaim the saving gospel of Jesus Christ, encouraging one another to grow in spiritual insight and discernment, and having a heartfelt concern for the sanctification of one another, or other close relationships.  

Question 5-12:  For those relationships with other believers that you characterize as koinōnia, were they centered on a specific event or happening, or was it a continuous and steady relationship?  Describe the duration of your koinōnia kind of relationship with other believers.  Please explain your answers.

Question 5-12A:  For your koinōnia kind of relationships with other believers, would you say you esteemed other believers above yourself?   Please explain your answer.

Question 5-13:  For koinōnia kind of relationships with other believers that have ended, were you disappointed they ended?  Do you still keep in contact with one or more of those other believers?  If so, is that something you enjoy or dread?  Please explain your answers.

Question 5-14:  Explain how you felt when you experienced koinōnia kind of relationships with other believers?  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-15:  Have you grown spiritually due to your koinōnia kind of relationships with other believers?  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-16:  Do you have or have you had any relationships with God the Father and God the Son that you consider to fall within the category of biblical koinōnia?   Please explain your answer in detail.  Please include in your answer the factors you believe help define those relationships as comprising biblical koinōnia.  These factors are along the line of those set out in Question 5-12. 

Question 5-17:  For those koinōnia relationships with God the Father and God the Son, were they long-term or short-term, or somewhat in between?  Were they centered on a specific event or happening, or was it a continuous and steady relationship? 

Question 5-18:  How do you feel when you experience the koinōnia kind of relationship with God the Father and/or God the Son?  Are there any other kinds of activities in which you feel the same sense as you did with your koinōnia kind relationships with God the Father and God the Son? 

Question 5-19:  Would you say that you grew spiritually due to experiencing your koinōnia kind of relationships with God the Father and God the Son?  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-20:  Has a koinōnia relationship you had with God the Father and God the Son ever ended?  How did you ascertain it had ended?  If so, were you disappointed it ended? 

Question 5-20A:  Do you have or have you had partnerships with people or that involved activities that you characterize as “iniquity” or “darkness?”  How do you feel about those partnerships?  Did you sense you were unequally yoked in these partnerships?  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-20B:  In reference to Question 5-20A, if all of those partnerships were in the past, over the course of such partnerships, please describe your spiritual condition? 

Question 5-20C:  In reference to Question 5-20A, if any of those partnerships still exists, do you have any plans to remove yourself from them?  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-21:  Do you believe you satisfy the “A Believer has Biblical Fellowship” test of salvation?   Please explain your answer and include evidence that supports your answer.  Do you strongly agree, moderately agree, moderately disagree, strong disagree or are neutral about the statement that you satisfy “A Believer has Biblical Fellowship” test of salvation?  Please record your answer at Indicator 5-B of your Personal Salvation Assessment in the Appendix.

Copyright © 2021, 2022 Stephen T. Belsheim All Rights Reserved

Your Self-Examination of Your Salvation is Biblical (on pages 5-8 of The Salvation Meter Book)

INTRODUCTION

Pages 5-8 of The Salvation Meter book describe the Scriptural basis behind the book under the heading “The Bible is the Substantive Basis for The Salvation Meter.” This article at https://thesalvationmeter.com website is a revision of the discussion and some of the questions in the book.  I hope this revision will assist anyone who reads, teaches or preaches, or merely considers the principles taught by the “The Bible is the Substantive Basis for The Salvation Meter.”  

This discussion is important because in an eternal sense, you fall into one of two categories of people; namely, those who are saved and those who are lost.  If you are saved, you will spend eternity in heaven in the presence of God.  If you are lost, you will suffer physical and emotional torment in hell for eternity.  You can undertake no greater exercise than to examine your salvation to make certain you possess a saving relationship with God through His Sin, Jesus Christ.

REVISED DISCUSSION

Introduction

Self-examination of your salvation is a biblical exercise.  The Apostle Paul and the Apostle Peter, each one writing under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, presented a clear biblical mandate for a person to examine their salvation, as well as their spiritual growth. 

In reference to 2 Corinthians 13:5, in a sermon entitled “The Place of Self-Examination” by Dr. S. Lewis Johnson found at the SLJ Institute website (see link at The Place of Self-Examination – SLJ Institute), Dr. Johnson set out persuasive reasons for a person to examine themselves to be if they are saved:

When we say, “Test ourselves or examine yourselves,” we’re saying something that we need in the United States of America, and in fact, in the Western world. There are literally millions of professing Christians who need to pay attention to this statement of the apostle. They have entered into a shallow commitment to Christianity, they’ve joined the church, they’ve been baptized or they’ve done other things that might make them think that they are genuine believers in the Lord Jesus Christ. They’ve been encouraged to think that, by men who’ve not been careful to point out that there is more to becoming a Christian than subscribing to a statement. They don’t hate sin. They don’t love holiness. They do not pray. They do not study the word of God. They do not walk humbly with God. These individuals, so many of them stand in the same danger in which the Corinthians stood. And the apostle’s words, “Test yourselves to see if your in the faith, examine yourselves,” are valid words that each of us should ponder.

            The preceptaustin.org website (link: 2 Corinthians 13:5 Commentary | Precept Austin) referenced the importance Charles Spurgeon placed on 2 Corinthians 13:5:

Spurgeon referred to 2 Cor 13:5 as a solemn text, that we cannot preach too impressively, or too frequent meditate.

            In reference to 2 Peter 1:10, Wuest (Wuest, K. S. (1997). Wuest’s word studies from the Greek New Testament: for the English reader (Vol. 12, pp. 27–28). Eerdmans) writes:

The exhortation is that the believer should make sure of the fact that he is saved by seeing to it that the Christian graces superabound in his life. There is no idea here of making sure that we retain our salvation but that we possess salvation.

Discussion of  2 Corinthians 13:5

The Apostle Paul articulated this mandate when he wrote 2 Corinthians 13:5 (ASV 1901), which reads:

5 Try your own selves, whether ye are in the faith; prove your own selves. Or know ye not as to your own selves, that Jesus Christ is in you? unless indeed ye be reprobate.

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb peirazō as “try.” According to Louw et al., it means, “to try to learn the nature or character of someone or something by submitting such to thorough and extensive testing—‘to test, to examine, to put to the test, examination, testing.'”  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). In Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 331). United Bible Societies.  The Logos 9 sense of the verb is to test – to put to the test in order to ascertain the nature of something, including imperfections, faults, or other qualities.  Peirazō is in the present tense and imperative mood.  

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb dokimazō as “prove.” It means to try to learn the genuineness of something by examination and testing, often through actual use—‘to test, to examine, to try to determine the genuineness of, testing.’  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 331.  The Logos 9 sense of dokimazō is to examine (check out) – to observe, check out, and look over carefully or inspect.  Like peirazō, dokimazō is in the present tense and imperative mood. 

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb epiginōskō as “know ye.” It means to come to an understanding as the result of ability to experience and learn—‘to come to understand, to perceive, to comprehend.’  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 381.  The Logos 9 sense is to recognize – to discern something clearly and distinctly, or as true and valid; often with a personal acquaintance that necessitates a reaction.  The verb is in the present tense.

By his use of the phrase “that Jesus Christ is in you,” Paul intended to refer to the condition of being saved.  One commentator (Constable, T. (2003). Tom Constable’s Expository Notes on the Bible (2 Co 13:5). Galaxie Software) writes:

“After twelve chapters in which Paul takes their Christianity for granted, can he only now be asking them to make sure they are born again?”

Another commentary (Wiersbe, W. W. (1992). Wiersbe’s expository outlines on the New Testament (p. 511). Victor Book) reads:

The Corinthians were spending a great deal of time examining Paul; now it was time they examined themselves. Socrates said, “The unexamined life is not worth living.” A true Christian experience will bear examination. “Are you even in the faith?” asked Paul. “Are you truly saved?” Every believer must prove his or her faith; no one can tell others whether or not they are born again.  A true Christian has Christ in him.

The alternative to being saved is “ye be reprobate.” The AVS 1901 translates the Greek noun adokimos as “reprobate.” It means pertaining to having been proven worthless—‘of no value, valueless, worth nothing.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 621.  The Logos 9 sense of is adokimos phony (bogus) – fraudulent; having a misleading appearance.

One commentator (Pratt, R. L., Jr. (2000). I & II Corinthians (Vol. 7, p. 440). Broadman & Holman Publishers) points out the usage of the reflexive pronoun heautous:

Paul used the reflexive pronoun yourselves twice to emphasize the idea that they should start looking more at themselves than at him or others.

Along the same line, one translation handbook (Omanson, R. L., & Ellington, J. (1993). A handbook on Paul’s second letter to the Corinthians (p. 240). United Bible Societies) reads:

The pronouns yourselves are both in emphatic position.

In summary, by writing 2 Corinthians 13:5, Paul commanded his audience to continuously submit their faith to thorough testing to discern the genuineness of their faith and thereby make sure it was not a phony, surface-only faith.  Sometimes the phony can look genuine, and when it comes to where you will spend eternity, the difference between the two is infinite.  Therefore, Paul was serious about the Corinthians expending the necessary time and effort to verify their salvation. 

Discussion of 2 Peter 1:9-11

            The Apostle Peter called for self-examination of one’s salvation when he wrote in 2 Peter 1:9–11 (ASV 1901), which reads:

9 For he that lacketh these things is blind, seeing only what is near, having forgotten the cleansing from his old sins. 10 Wherefore, brethren, give the more diligence to make your calling and election sure: for if ye do these things, ye shall never stumble: 11 for thus shall be richly supplied unto you the entrance into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

When it comes to self-examination, the pertinent phrase reads, “Wherefore, brethren, give the more diligence to make your calling and election sure.” This phrase begins with the Greek inferential conjunction dio which is a coordinating conjunction that conveys a deduction, conclusion, summary, or inference to the preceding discussion.  Heiser, M. S., & Setterholm, V. M. (2013; 2013). Glossary of Morpho-Syntactic Database Terminology. Lexham Press. 

The preceding discussion is verse 9, which reads:

9 For he that lacketh these things is blind, seeing only what is near, having forgotten the cleansing from his old sins.

The “these things” referred to by verse 9 are the virtues Peter identified in verses 5-7 (ASV 1901), which read:

 5 Yea, and for this very cause adding on your part all diligence, in your faith supply virtue; and in your virtue knowledge; 6 and in your knowledge self-control; and in your self-control patience; and in your patience godliness; 7 and in your godliness brotherly kindness; and in your brotherly kindness love.

Referring to verse 10a, the ASV1901 translates the Greek verb spoudazō as “give … diligence.” It means to do something with intense effort and motivation—‘to work hard, to do one’s best, to endeavor.’  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 661. The Logos 9 sense is to be eager – to have or show keen interest, intense desire, or impatient expectancy.  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek adverb mallon as “more.” It is a marker of contrast indicating an alternative—‘on the contrary, instead, but rather.  See Louw et a., supra at Vol. 1, p. 793.  The Logos 9 sense is more (extent) – to a greater degree or extent.  It appears what Peter intended to convey to his audience is that in light of the lack of virtues indicative of salvation, they should try even harder to carry out the next action, which was “to make your calling and election sure.”

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb poieō as “to make.” It means to produce something new, with the implication of using materials already in existence (in contrast with κτίζω ‘to create,’ 42.35)—’to make, to fashion.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 513.  The Logos 9 sense is to make (change) – to give certain properties to something.  The verb is in the present tense, which is the verb tense where the writer portrays an action in process or a state of being with no assessment of the action’s completion.  See Heiser et al. Id.

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun klēsis as “calling.” It means the state of having been called to a particular task and/or relation—‘calling.’ See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 423.  The Logos 9 sense is: calling (state) – the condition one enters upon the acceptance of a summons; especially all that is expected of a person who accepts God’s summons to the hope of salvation in Jesus. 

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun eklogē as “election.” It means to make a special choice based upon significant preference, often implying a strongly favorable attitude toward what is chosen—‘to choose, choice.’  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 360.  The Logos 9 sense is election – the act of deliberately selecting someone or something.

The ASV 1901 translates the Greek adjective bebaios as “sure.” It means pertaining to being certain, on the basis of being well established—‘certain, sure.  See Louw et al., supra at Vol. 1, p. 669.  The Logos 9 sense is verified – proved to be true.

One commentator (Walls, D., & Anders, M. (1999). I & II Peter, I, II & III John, Jude (Vol. 11, p. 111). Broadman & Holman Publishers) writes:

Thus, the expression make your calling and election sure must not be construed to suggest that God has any doubts regarding their faith or calling. The problem of doubt or questioning is one the readers struggled with, not God.

As you begin to see changes and transformations occurring in your life, this should reassure you that God has called you to himself. These changes serve to “make your calling and election sure.” The opposite is also true. If your life shows no positive changes and this causes you no concern, then you should wonder and question whether you are a true believer in Jesus Christ.

            It appears that by 2 Peter 1:9-11, Peter intended to convey to his audience that if any were lacking the virtues set out in verses 5-7, they must try their absolute best to confirm their salvation intensely.  Proving the truth of their salvation was not something they were to be lackadaisical about because it concerned where they would spend eternity.

Conclusion

            The self-examination advocated by Paul and Peter was not a cursory exercise.  They were purposeful when they commanded their audience to conduct a rigorous examination of their spiritual condition.  You, too, must be focused about making sure your faith is a saving faith and not a phony faith.  The Salvation Meter is an excellent self-diagnostic tool for you to carry out the type of examination prescribed by Paul and Peter.  

            The above passages should generate an incentive for every person to spend the necessary time and effort to carry out a thorough self-examination of their salvation, as well as their spiritual growth.   Please answer the following questions that relate to the biblical guidance set forth in 2 Corinthians 5:13 and 2 Peter 1:9-11. 

QUESTIONS

Question 1-9: Are you willing to spend the time and effort to work through the substance of The Salvation Meter to conduct a thorough self-examination to gain an understanding of your spiritual condition?  Please explain your answer. 

Question 1-9A: Do you share the urgency of self-examination of someone’s salvation as expressed by Paul in 2 Corinthians 13:4 and Peter in 2 Peter 1:10?  Please explain your answer.

Question 1-9B: Do you agree that some people who are lost display a self-only faith that is, in reality a phony?  Please explain your answer.

Question 1-9C: Do you agree with Dr. Johnson that people who profess a faith in Jesus Christ, and yet, do not hate sin, do not love holiness, do not pray, do not study the Bible, or do not walk humbly with God should examine their salvation?  Please explain your answer.

Question 1-9D:  Do you strongly agree, moderately agree, moderately disagree, strongly disagree or are neutral about your willingness to invest the time and effort to use The Salvation Meter?  Please record your answer at Indicator 1-A of your Personal Salvation Assessment in the Appendix. 

© Copyright 2021, 2022. Stephen T. Belsheim.  All Rights Reserved

A Believer Abides in God (Revised) on Pages 106-110 of The Salvation Meter Book

INTRODUCTION

Pages 106-110 of The Salvation Meter book describe the “A Believer Abides in God” test of salvation.  This article at https://thesalvationmeter.com website is a revision of the discussion and questions in the book that pertain to this test of salvation.  There are two basic reasons I wrote this revision.

First, a sermon is never finished merely preached.  In the same way, there will always be ways to revise and improve the discussion of the “A Believer Abides in God” test of salvation.  Second, I hope this revision will assist anyone who reads, teaches or preaches, or merely considers the substance of this test to better appreciate the principles taught this test of salvation. 

The “A Believer Abides in God” is an essential test of salvation that indicates a person’s spiritual condition.  It is strong evidence of a lost condition if a person does not abide in God.  On the other hand, it is strong evidence of salvation if a person possesses the menō relationship with God the Father and God the Son.  My hope is that through this discussion and questions, the reader will arrive at a firm appreciation of whether or not they possess the menō relationship with God the Father and God the Son.  If the reader does not think they possess the menō relationship with God the Father and God the Son, they should seek counsel about their spiritual condition because they may not be saved. 

REVISED DISCUSSION

1 John 4:13, 15, 16b and 1 John 2:24

The Apostle John set out “A Believer Abides in God” test of salvation, focusing on a person’s post-conversion spiritual condition.  John articulated this test through passages like 1 John 4:13, 15, and 16b.  He elaborated on this test by what he wrote in 1 John 2:24.  For the sake of completeness, 1 John 4:13, 15, and 16b (ASV 1901) are below:

13 hereby we know that we abide in him and he in us, because he hath given us of his Spirit. … 15 Whosoever shall confess that Jesus is the Son of God, God abideth in him, and he in God. … 16b God is love; and he that abideth in love abideth in God, and God abideth in him.

Each of the five usages of menō in the above passage, which the ASV 1901 translates as “abide” or “abideth,” is in the present tense, which signifies that the Apostle John did not convey any assessment of the completion of the relationship defined by menō.  See Heiser, M. S., & Setterholm, V. M. (2013; 2013). Glossary of Morpho-Syntactic Database Terminology. Lexham Press.  

            And, 1 John 2:24 (ASV 1901) reads:

24 As for you, let that abide in you which ye heard from the beginning. If that which ye heard from the beginning abide in you, ye also shall abide in the Son, and in the Father.

The ASV 1901 translates the first usage of menō as “let … abide,” and it is in the present tense and imperative mood.  John intended to command his audience to continuously let the saving gospel of Jesus Christ menō in them. Referring to verse 24b, the ASV 1901 translates the second usage of menō as “abide,” which is in the aorist tense and subjective mood.  The ASV 1901 translates the third usage of menō as “shall abide,” in the future tense.  When he wrote v. 24b, John intended to convey to his audience that if there was a menō relationship with the saving gospel of Jesus Christ, there was a menō relationship between God the Father and God the Son and the believer.

Usages of menō

The key to increasing one’s understanding of this test of salvation is to better comprehend the Greek verb menō and how it applies to defining a 21st Century believer’s relationship with God the Father and God the Son, i.e., Jesus Christ.  Some usages of menō in the Septuagint (LXX) referred to the eternality of God per Psalm 102:12 (ASV 1901):

12 But thou, O Jehovah, wilt abide for ever; And thy memorial name unto all generations.

And, the enduring righteousness of God per Psalms 110:3 and 111:3:

Psalm 110:3 (ASV 1901) – 3 Thy people offer themselves willingly In the day of thy power, in holy array: Out of the womb of the morning Thou hast the dew of thy youth.

Psalm 111:3 (ASV 1901) – 3 His work is honor and majesty; And his righteousness endureth for ever.

And refer to the truth that God’s Word stands forever per Isaiah 40:8 (ASV 1901)

8 The grass withereth, the flower fadeth; but the word of our God shall stand forever.

These usages in the LXX point to a sense of permanence and steadfastness regarding God’s attributes and His Word.  Permanence and steadfastness are essential indicators of the existence of a menō relationship.

According to Logos 9, there are over one hundred usages of menō in the New Testament.  My review of these usages generated the following takeaways about the Greek verb menō.

First, it appears that menō is a relationship that happens.  In other words, at some point menō did not exist and then something took place here it did.  John 1:32–33 (ASV 1901) seems to demonstrate this fact when the Holy Spirit was “descending, and abiding upon” Jesus:

32 And John bare witness, saying, I have beheld the Spirit descending as a dove out of heaven; and it abode upon him. 33 And I knew him not: but he that sent me to baptize in water, he said unto me, Upon whomsoever thou shalt see the Spirit descending, and abiding upon him, the same is he that baptizeth in the Holy Spirit.

Prior to conversion, a believer does not have menō with God.  But, upon conversion, the menō relationship between God and a believer comes into existence.

Second, a very difficult teaching by Jesus is presented in John 6:53–58 (ASV 1901)

53 Jesus therefore said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man and drink his blood, ye have not life in yourselves. 54 He that eateth my flesh and drinketh my blood hath eternal life: and I will raise him up at the last day. 55 For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed. 56 He that eateth my flesh and drinketh my blood abideth in me, and I in him. 57 As the living Father sent me, and I live because of the Father; so he that eateth me, he also shall live because of me. 58 This is the bread which came down out of heaven: not as the fathers ate, and died; he that eateth this bread shall live for ever.

When someone eats food, its nourishment goes to the whole body.  The nourishment becomes integral with that person.  This is consistent with what Whiteacre (Whitacre, R. A. (1999). John (Vol. 4, p. 167). Westmont, IL: IVP Academic) says when he writes that eating and the drinking has to do with shared life that is a mutual indwelling. The menō relationship between God and a believer is an inseparable union between God and the believer.

Third, Jesus’ teaching about the vine and the branches is a very effective metaphor to better comprehend the nature of what it means to “abide.”  John 15:1–11 (ASV 1901) reads:

1 I am the true vine, and my Father is the husbandman. 2 Every branch in me that beareth not fruit, he taketh it away: and every branch that beareth fruit, he cleanseth it, that it may bear more fruit. 3 Already ye are clean because of the word which I have spoken unto you. 4 Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; so neither can ye, except ye abide in me. 5 I am the vine, ye are the branches: He that abideth in me, and I in him, the same beareth much fruit: for apart from me ye can do nothing. 6 If a man abide not in me, he is cast forth as a branch, and is withered; and they gather them, and cast them into the fire, and they are burned. 7 If ye abide in me, and my words abide in you, ask whatsoever ye will, and it shall be done unto you. 8 Herein is my Father glorified, that ye bear much fruit; and so shall ye be my disciples. 9 Even as the Father hath loved me, I also have loved you: abide ye in my love. 10 If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love; even as I have kept my Father’s commandments, and abide in his love. 11 These things have I spoken unto you, that my joy may be in you, and that your joy may be made full.

A more detailed look at this passage reveals the following.

            In verses 1-3, Jesus defined the relationship between God the Father (the husbandman) and Himself (the vine).  He also described the relationship between Himself and humans in that He was the vine, and people were the branches.  Lastly, He distinguished between lost people and saved people.  Lost people were equated to unproductive branches whose eternal destiny was destruction per John 15:2a, 6 (ASV 1901)

2a Every branch in me that beareth not fruit, he taketh it away: … 6 If a man abide not in me, he is cast forth as a branch, and is withered; and they gather them, and cast them into the fire, and they are burned.

Saved people were equated to productive branches that God then “cleanseth it, that it may bear more fruit.”  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek verb kathairō as “cleanseth.”  The Logos 9 sense is to prune, meaning to cut back the growth of a plant so that it can grow healthier or produce more fruit.  Cleaning in the spiritual sense is like pruning in that God removes the things in a believer’s life that impede or stunt their spiritual growth.  Sometimes a believer can themselves remove hindrances.  A believer’s self-removal of hindrances is consistent with what the writer of Hebrews wrote in Hebrews 12:1–2 (ASV 1901):

1 Therefore let us also, seeing we are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, 2 looking unto Jesus the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising shame, and hath sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.

In other instances, God may have to discipline a believer per Hebrews 12:5–11 (ASV 1901):

5 and ye have forgotten the exhortation which reasoneth with you as with sons, My son, regard not lightly the chastening of the Lord, Nor faint when thou art reproved of him; 6 For whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth, And scourgeth every son whom he receiveth. 7 It is for chastening that ye endure; God dealeth with you as with sons; for what son is there whom his father chasteneth not? 8 But if ye are without chastening, whereof all have been made partakers, then are ye bastards, and not sons. 9 Furthermore, we had the fathers of our flesh to chasten us, and we gave them reverence: shall we not much rather be in subjection unto the Father of spirits, and live? 10 For they indeed for a few days chastened us as seemed good to them; but he for our profit, that we may be partakers of his holiness. 11 All chastening seemeth for the present to be not joyous but grievous; yet afterward it yieldeth peaceable fruit unto them that have been exercised thereby, even the fruit of righteousness.

            A branch is integral with the vine so that nourishment flows from the vine to each branch.   Only through God does a believer receive sustenance to live a life that produces spiritual fruit and gives glory to God.  In this regard, verses 4-5 (ASV 1901) read:

4 Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; so neither can ye, except ye abide in me. 5 I am the vine, ye are the branches: He that abideth in me, and I in him, the same beareth much fruit: for apart from me ye can do nothing.

To produce spiritual fruit throughout their life, a believer must abide in an integral and intimate relationship with God. 

            Verse 7 (ASV 1901) reads:

7 If ye abide in me, and my words abide in you, ask whatsoever ye will, and it shall be done unto you.

This verse stresses the importance of Jesus’ words to remain in a believer.  A believer is to have intimate knowledge of Jesus’ teachings to adhere to correct fundamental biblical teaching about Jesus and the gospel.  See the “A Believer is a Bible Engager” test of salvation on pages 144-150 of The Salvation Meter book and the “A Believer is a Learner” test of salvation on pages 150-153 of The Salvation Meter book.  This condition displays itself when a believer’s actions and responses mirror those of Jesus.  Answered prayer is another demonstration that Jesus’ words remain in a believer.  See the “A Believer Experiences Answered Prayer” on pages 204-207 of The Salvation Meter book.

Verse 8 (ASV 1901) reads:

8 Herein is my Father glorified, that ye bear much fruit; and so shall ye be my disciples.

This verse stresses the importance of an abiding believer producing spiritual fruit of the Spirit.  This means their life should display love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, and self-control consistent with Galatians 5:22-23.  Typically, fruit of the Spirit will become more visible over time as a believer grows spiritually.  See the section entitled “A Believer Displays the Fruit of the Spirit” on pages 94-104 of The Salvation Meter book.

Verse 9 (ASV 1901) reads:

9 Even as the Father hath loved me, I also have loved you: abide ye in my love.

Verse 9 stresses abiding in love which pertains to the “A Believer Loves Other Believers” test of salvation found on pages 190-194 of The Salvation Meter book. 

Verses 10-11 (ASV 1901) read:

10 If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love; even as I have kept my Father’s commandments, and abide in his love. 11 These things have I spoken unto you, that my joy may be in you, and that your joy may be made full.

Verse 10 emphasizes obedience to God.  Verse 11 describes that Jesus’ joy is in a believer.  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun chara as “joy” and it means great happiness and pleasure.  The chara Jesus described may be made full through obedience to God.  Verses 10-11 relate to the “A Believer is Obedient to God” test of salvation found at pages 138-142 of The Salvation Meter book. 

Finally, Campbell et al. (Campbell et al., The Theological Wordbook, (2000), Word Publishing, Nashville, Tennessee) point out that although 2 Peter 1:1-11 does not use menō, there are similarities between John 15:1-11 and 2 Peter 1:1-11 (ASV 1901), which reads:

1 Simon Peter, a servant and apostle of Jesus Christ, to them that have obtained a like precious faith with us in the righteousness of our God and the Saviour Jesus Christ: 2 Grace to you and peace be multiplied in the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord; 3 seeing that his divine power hath granted unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge of him that called us by his own glory and virtue; 4 whereby he hath granted unto us his precious and exceeding great promises; that through these ye may become partakers of the divine nature, having escaped from the corruption that is in the world by lust. 5 Yea, and for this very cause adding on your part all diligence, in your faith supply virtue; and in your virtue knowledge; 6 and in your knowledge self-control; and in your self-control patience; and in your patience godliness; 7 and in your godliness brotherly kindness; and in your brotherly kindness love. 8 For if these things are yours and abound, they make you to be not idle nor unfruitful unto the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. 9 For he that lacketh these things is blind, seeing only what is near, having forgotten the cleansing from his old sins. 10 Wherefore, brethren, give the more diligence to make your calling and election sure: for if ye do these things, ye shall never stumble: 11 for thus shall be richly supplied unto you the entrance into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

A review of 2 Peter 1:1-11 developed the below takeaways.

            First, God’s power grants a believer called by God all things that pertain to life and godliness which means that God is able to grow a believer spiritually.  This growth has a reverential aspect in that a believer’s reverence and awe of God grows over time.  A believer fully appreciates their complete and necessary dependence upon the one, true living God via confession and actions.  Also, a believer seeks their life in Christ more intensely and with a submissive mindset.  Further, spiritual growth increases a believer’s obedience to God.  See the “A Believer is Obedient to God” test of salvation at pages 138-142 of The Salvation Meter book.  Finally, the fact that God calls a believer should result in the display of extreme gratitude to God for the sacrifice of Jesus Christ on the Cross. 

            Second, a believer is a partaker of the divine nature, which defines a menō relationship between God and a believer.  While a believer never becomes “divine” like God, a believer ought to move closer to God’s nature, and in doing so, move away from sin in the broadest possible sense.  This “divine” nature should be the source for a new life which a believer has a desire to obey God, i.e., do God’s will. 

            Third, a believer has “all diligence” to possess the listing of attributes set out in verses 5-7.  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek noun spoudē as “diligence” and it means to try one’s very best in attempting to do something.  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 662). New York: United Bible Societies.  The Logos 9 sense of spoudē is to do something with an excited fervor.  Spoudē is modified by pas, which means the full quantity. The expression “all diligence” means a whole-hearted mentality to try one’s best to possess these attributes.

The first attribute is “faith,” which is the English translation by the AVS1901 of the Greek noun pistis, which means to have complete trust and reliance in something that is usually understood.  In this usage, pistis refers to complete trust and reliance in the saving gospel of Jesus Christ for salvation.  See the section entitled “The Irreducible Minimum of the Saving Gosepl of Jesus Christ” at pages 72-77 of The Salvation Meter book.  Pistis is not in the listing of the fruit of the Spirit in Galatians 5:22-23. 

The second attribute is the Greek aretē which the ASV 1901 translates as “virtue.”  It means outstanding moral goodness or excellence. It is not in the listing of the fruit of the Spirit in Galatians 5:22-23. 

The third attribute is knowledge, which is the ASV 1901 translation of the Greek noun gnōsis.  It means the result or content of perception, learning, and reasoning.  In this context, it is the knowledge of how to live a holy life.  It is not in the listing of the fruit of the Spirit in Galatians 5:22-23. 

The fourth attribute is the Greek noun enkrateia which the AVS 1901 translates as “self-control.”  It means to exercise complete control over one’s desires and actions.  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 750). New York: United Bible Societies.  Enkrateia is a fruit of the Spirit in Galatians 5:22-23, which is the subject of discussion found on pages 94-104 of The Salvation Meter book.

A fifth attribute is “patience,” which is the translation of the Greek nonu hypomonē.  It means the capacity to continue to bear up under difficult circumstances.  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 307). New York: United Bible Societies.  In addition to merely bearing up, this word has the sense of contending.  There is an active dynamic sense in addition to a passive static sense.  It is not in the listing of the fruit of the Spirit in Galatians 5:22-23. 

A sixth attribute is eusebeia which the ASV 1901 translates a “godliness.”  It means appropriate beliefs and the practice of these beliefs about God.  It is not in the listing o the fruit of the Spirit in Galatians 5:22-23. 

The seventh attribute is the Greek noun philadelphia which the ASV 1901 translates as “brotherly kindness.”  It means the love that exists between fellow believers in the Lord Jesus Christ.  It is not in the listing of the fruit of the Spirit in Galatians 5:22-23, but is consistent with the “A Believer Loves Other Believers” test of salvation at pages 190-194 of The Salvation Meter book. 

The eighth and final attribute is “love,” which is the translation by the ASV 1901 of the Greek noun agapē.  It means to have love for someone or something, based on sincere appreciation and high regard.  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 292). New York: United Bible Societies.  It is the kind of love that cause s a believer to deny themselves for the benefit or good for the person who is the object of their love.  It is one in the listing of the fruit of the Spirit in Galatians 5:22-23, which is the subject of the discussion on pages 94-104 of the book.   

The existence of these attributes evidences a menō relationship between God and a believer. 

            Fourth, a believer who practices the above eight attributes will not be idle nor unfruitful.   In 1 Peter 1:8, the ASV 1901 translates the Greek adjective argos as “idle.”  It means pertaining to being useless, in the sense of accomplishing nothing.  See Louw, J. P., & Nida, E. A. (1996). Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament: based on semantic domains (electronic ed. of the 2nd edition., Vol. 1, p. 624). New York: United Bible Societies.  The ASV 1901 translates the Greek adjective akarpos as “unfruitful,” and it has the same meaning as argos.   The existence of a menō relationship between God and a believer demands that a believer not be useless when it comes to serving God. 

            Fifth, a believer does not forget their cleansing from sin, which is a condition that defines a menō relationship between God and a believer.  It is a dangerous condition for a believer in having forgotten the grace of God in their life.

Conclusion

The “A Believer Abides in God” is a significant test of salvation.  While the menō relationship is somewhat subjective, the above Scriptures define it with sufficient precision, so a person should assess if they possess a menō relationship with God the Father and God the Son. If a person does not think they possess the menō relationship with God the Father and God the Son, they should seek counsel about their spiritual condition because they may not be saved. 

The Scriptures that define and support this test generate the following questions for you to answer.  The attributes connected with a menō relationship touch upon many of the other tests of salvation in this book.  Hopefully, the below questions do not duplicate questions connected with other tests of salvation that possess menō as a component.

QUESTIONS

Question 5-1A:  How do you describe your menō relationship with God the Father and God the Son?  It your meno relationship something that was absent and then came into existence at your conversion?  Is it a close or distant relationship or somewhere in between?  In your description, you may want to consider the metaphor of the vine and the branches (John 15:1-11).  Possibly, your description may include how God has granted you power to live a more holy life.  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-1B:  Keeping in mind that during their earthly life, no one is perfect or will ever achieve perfection or ever will become “like God,” do you sense that you are a partaker in the divine nature?  Do you feel like you are moving more toward God and more away from the sin and corruption of the world?  Do you feel like you have a “power source” that enables you to live a life more pleasing to God?  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-1C:  Do you sense that you possess some or all of the attributes of virtue, knowledge, self-control, patience, godliness, brotherly kindness, and love found in 2 Peter 1:1-11?  Do you display some of these attributes more fully than others?  Identify the attributes you display more fully.  Do you have a desire to increase the presence of these attributes in your life?  Is this especially the case concerning the least visible attributes in your life?  Please explain your answers.

Question 5-1D:  Do you remember (i.e., not forget) the cleansing from sin that you received at your conversion?  Are there actions you take to help yourself remember how God cleansed you from sin?  Please explain your answers.

Question 5-2:  Is your menō relationship with God the Father and God the Son continuous or steady?  Does it have a sense of permanence and steadfastness?  Please keep in mind your answers to Questions 5-1A through 5-1D that help define a menō relationship between God the Father and God the Son and yourself.  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-3:  Are there common threads between the times you felt strongly a continuous or steady relationship with God the Father and God the Son?  Please keep in mind your answers to Questions 5-1A through 5-1D that help define a menō relationship between God the Father and God the Son and yourself.  Please explain your answer.   

Question 5-4:  Is your relationship with God the Father and God the Son more robust or intense at different times in your life (e.g., during times of trouble, times of plenty and joy, times that are “neutral”)?  Please keep in mind your answers to Questions 5-1A through 5-1D that help define a menō relationship between God the Father and God the Son and yourself.  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-5:  Have there been interruptions in your menō relationship with God the Father and God the Son?  If so, have they been for a short period, or were they extended?  Would you describe these interruptions as a definite break or more of a lessening of the intensity in your menō relationship with God the Father and God the Son?  Are there common threads between the times when you felt an interruption in your relationship with God the Father and God the Son?   Please keep in mind your answers to Questions 5-1A through 5-1D that help define a menō relationship between God the Father and God the Son and yourself. Would you please take some time to explain your answers? 

Question 5-6:  Do disruptions in your relationship with God the Father and God the Son typically occur during times of less stress and challenge in your life?  Please keep in mind your answers to Questions 5-1A through 5-1D that help define a menō relationship between God the Father and God the Son and yourself.  Please explain your answer.

Question 5-7:  What mental picture do you draw when you think about the fact that God the Father and God the Son abide in you?  How does that make you feel?  Is it a condition that seems to be overwhelming?  Is it a condition that exists right now?  Please keep in mind your answers to Questions 5-1A through 5-1D that help define a menō relationship between God the Father and God the Son and yourself.  Please explain your answers.

Question 5-8:  If you had to describe several different happenings in your life that support the fact of mutual abiding between God the Father and God the Son and yourself, what would they be?  When you were experiencing these events, did you appreciate that God was present, or did God seem distant or uninvolved?  Did any of these instances include you putting aside hindrances to your spiritual growth?  Did any of these instances include God disciplining you to remove such hindrances from your life?  In hindsight, did you comprehend the experience of your menō relationship with God the Father and God the Son at the time of the event?  Please keep in mind your answers to Questions 5-1A through 5-1D that help define a menō relationship between God the Father and God the Son and yourself.  Please explain your answers.

Question 5-9:   Keeping in mind that a mutual abiding exists between God the Father and God the Son and a believer, do you possess that kind of menō relationship?  Please keep in mind your answers to Questions 5-1A through 5-1D that help define a menō relationship between God the Father and God the Son and yourself.

Question 5-9A:  Do you have a desire to increase the menō relationship between God the Father and God the Son and yourself?  Do you intend to establish ways to increase that menō relationship?  Please describe your plan to increase your menō relationship and include a description of any accountability mechanisms in your plan.

Question 5-10:  Do you believe you satisfy the “A Believer Abides in God” test of salvation?  Please explain your answer and include evidence that supports your answer.  Do you strongly agree, moderately agree, moderately disagree, strongly disagree, or are neutral about the statement that you satisfy the “A Believer Abides in God” test of salvation?  Please record your answer at Indicator 5-A of your Personal Salvation Assessment in the Appendix.

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